We look forward to bringing change and serving the public, say Saudi female passport staff

1 / 2
Saudi women are eager to work in the country’s passport offices. (SPA)
2 / 2
Saudi women are eager to work in the country’s passport offices. (SPA)
Updated 20 September 2018
0

We look forward to bringing change and serving the public, say Saudi female passport staff

  • Female staff undergo theoretical training in military and security culture, as well as passports procedures

RIYADH: Women who have begun the training program for security personnel dealing with passports have said their recruitment will empower women and expand their participation in serving Saudi society.
The two-week training program, which was launched a week ago, is being implemented in nine Saudi provinces under the supervision of the Passports Department training center. It aims to introduce 290 women trainees to the sector’s work and procedures, methods of examining documents, and the culture of military and security, in addition to improving their interpersonal and professional skills.
In an interview with Arab News, trainees said they were ready to provide and improve services in all departments and disciplines.
Trainee Norah Hassan Al-Shehri said: “The most important thing I have learned is to listen and do as my management says while complying with the laws and regulations.
“As a passports employee, I receive passengers, whether citizens, expatriates, pilgrims, or diplomats, take their passports and visas, make sure they are effective and match the individual’s real data and image, I take their biometric features (fingerprints) and ensure their validity.”
Al-Shehri added: “We undergo theoretical training in military and security culture, as well as passports procedures and laws to implement them once we start working.”
She stressed the importance of preserving the image of Saudi Muslim women, who are loyal to their country, religion, and leadership, in addition to respecting their management and colleagues and performing their duties professionally.
“My new job means a lot to me as I contribute to the great honor of serving my country,” she said. “I aim to reach the highest rank and prove that women are capable of bearing the workload.”
She concluded that it is a great honor for her to serve her country and leadership, highlighting that the passports sector is a vital one for all segments of society.
“We aim to ensure the security of this country through our work with the Directorate General of Passports,” she said.
Trainee Sumaya Mohammed Al-Harthi said she has learned about a group of general services, including serving citizens and residents to ensure the security and safety of this country in the first place, in addition to facilitating their procedures.
“We have also received comprehensive training in security and military culture to enhance the women staff’s security sense,” she added.
Al-Harthi emphasized that it is important to equip women with a good understanding of the passport laws and duties as well as their rights and responsibilities.
She said: “Getting a job in a sensitive department that requires sufficient discipline and a strong sense of responsibility means a lot to me, and I seek to achieve many goals through my role.”
Al-Harthi added that she was delighted to see women in such roles and with society’s blessings, hoping to achieve more faith in women’s abilities to hold higher positions and have more authority.
She stressed the importance of having women take jobs that allow them to improve their skills, in addition to giving them the authority to make decisions and seize opportunities.
Trainee Amsha Al-Sahli said passports employees should give a good first impression of Saudi Arabia as their work includes serving the departures and arrivals, ensuring the validity of their official documents, verifying their travel status, taking necessary measures, verifying travel permits, and ensuring that biometric features (fingerprints) are identical.
Al-Sahli explained that she received theoretical training that introduced her to the sector’s work and procedures, taught her how to examine documents, educated her on military and security culture, and improved her professional and interpersonal skills.
She stressed that the department’s female staff seek to prove that women are capable of handling and quickly completing tasks, and are keen to improve their skills in the field.
Al-Sahli said: “I am honored to be part of this sector and thankful for the opportunity to serve my country through my job with the Directorate General of Passports. I ask Allah to help me, and I hope women’s knowledge and skills contribute to Saudi Arabia’s development and prosperity.”
She pointed out that women are an important part of society and that the time for their integration in the job market has come, especially in the military sector.
“We strive to fulfill our duties and be able to bring about positive change to reflect the honorable image of Saudi women,” she continued.
“I am very optimistic and will do my best as I support empowering women for my faith in their ability to professionally contribute to serving Saudi Arabia. This has been recognized by our wise leadership, who made new decisions to empower women.
“My message to those who wish to join us is to have complete confidence in our leadership and to do their best to serve Saudi Arabia.”


Huge expectations from Saudi crown prince’s Korea visit

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. (SPA)
Updated 2 min 17 sec ago
0

Huge expectations from Saudi crown prince’s Korea visit

  • The export of South Korea’s APR-1400 nuclear reactor technology to Saudi Arabia is high on the agenda

SEOUL: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is due to meet South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Wednesday to discuss wider economic ties between the two countries, according to the presidential office.
The crown prince’s visit to South Korea is the first by an heir to the throne of the world’s largest oil exporter since then-Crown Prince Abdullah’s tour in 1998. The crown prince will also attend the G20 Summit next week in Osaka, Japan.
The two-day visit is expected to deliver key agreements with South Korea in a variety of industrial fields, including cooperation on nuclear reactor and defense technologies.
“Saudi Arabia, a key ally of South Korea, is the biggest oil supplier to our government and the largest economic partner among the Middle Eastern countries,” presidential spokeswoman Koh Min-jung told reporters.
“Both leaders are expected to discuss detailed measures to expand bilateral cooperation beyond the traditional areas of construction and energy to the sectors of information and technology, nuclear energy, green cars, health, public service and exchange of human resources.”
The crown prince and his economic advisers are scheduled to have luncheon with South Korean business leaders after his summit with President Moon, she said.
Business leaders attending the luncheon will include Lee Jae-yong, vice chairman of Samsung Electronics; Chung Eui-sun, vice chairman of Hyundai Motor Group; Chey Tae-won, chairman of SK Group, and Koo Kwang-mo, chairman of LG Group.
A Samsung spokesman, who declined to be named, told Arab News that his company has a package of business proposals to present to Saudi Arabia.
“We’re not sure at the moment what business elements the Kingdom wants, but we have a variety of business packages that can meet the Saudi Vision 2030 requirements, ranging from engineering, procurement and construction to information and communications technology, and artificial intelligence,” the spokesman said.
Hyundai Motor Group was cautious about revealing potential business projects with Riyadh.
“We’ll see what’s happening. We have high expectations about potential business cooperation with Saudi Arabia,” a Hyundai Motor spokesman said, while asking not to be named.
The export of South Korea’s APR-1400 nuclear reactor technology to Saudi Arabia is high on the agenda.
Team Korea, led by the Korea Electric Power Corp., was shortlisted last year for a nuclear power plant construction project in Saudi Arabia, along with the US, China, France and Russia. The project by the King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy is aimed at building two nuclear power plants by 2030.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Different South Korean companies are reportedly keen to invest in Saudi Arabia and become part of Vision 2030’s success.

• The Saudi leader is also expected to attend a ceremony celebrating the completion of Saudi-owned S-Oil’s residue upgrading facility.

• Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman will also attend the G20 Summit next week in Osaka, Japan.

With Riyadh reportedly leaning toward the US bidder, Team Korea is considering forming a strategic consortium with the US side, according to government sources.
“The possibility of the Korea-US consortium for the Saudi project is a feasible option,” said Huh Min-ho, a researcher of Shinhan Invest Corp., referring to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s approval of the technical design of South Korea’s APR-1400 reactors.
“For South Korea, joining hands with the US is a feasible option to win the Saudi nuclear reactor contract, though the total order amount would be reduced,” the analyst said. “Once the Saudi project is won, more orders are expected to come from other countries such as the UK, the Czech Republic and Poland.”
South Korea already has a nuclear power footprint in in the Middle East after its construction of the Barakah nuclear power plant in the UAE. The country recently won a five-year maintenance deal for the nuclear plant with Nawah Energy Co., the operator of the plant.
The Saudi crown prince is also interested in South Korea’s weapons development technology, according to defense sources, and is scheduled to visit the Agency for Defense Development, South Korea’s only weapons developing agency, during his stay.
“We heard the crown prince is interested in the transfer of weapons technology when his country imports foreign weapons systems,” a Defense Ministry official told Arab News.
The Saudi leader is also expected to attend a ceremony celebrating the completion of Saudi-owned S-Oil’s residue upgrading facility. S-Oil, which is wholly owned by state-run Saudi Aramco, is third-largest oil refiner in South Korea.