What We Are Reading Today: Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C.

Updated 10 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C.

  • The nature of “style as a concept of expression,” an issue that becomes more important given the increasingly multiple styles

AUTHOR: William A. P. Childs

Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C. analyzes the broad character of art produced during this period, providing an in-depth analysis of and commentary on many of its most notable examples of sculpture and painting.
Taking into consideration developments in style and subject matter, and elucidating political, religious, and intellectual context, William A. P. Childs argues that Greek art in this era was a natural outgrowth of the high classical period and focused on developing the rudiments of individual expression that became the hallmark of the classical in the fifth century.
As Childs shows, in many respects the art of this period corresponds with the philosophical inquiry by Plato and his contemporaries into the nature of art and speaks to the contemporaneous sense of insecurity and renewed religious devotion. Delving into formal and iconographic developments in sculpture and painting, Childs examines how the sensitive, expressive quality of these works seamlessly links the classical and Hellenistic periods.


What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

Updated 20 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

  • New book reveals business model that underpins the digital world

Shoshana Zuboff’s new book is a chilling exposé of the business model that underpins the digital world. 

A review published in goodreads.com said that The Age of Surveillance Capitalism is neither a hand-wringing narrative of danger and decline nor a digital fairy tale. Rather, it offers a deeply reasoned and evocative examination of the contests over the next chapter of capitalism that will decide the meaning of information civilization in the 21st century. 

The Age of Surveillance Capital is a striking and illuminating book. 

A fellow reader remarked to me that it reminded him of Thomas Piketty’s magnum opus, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, in that it opens one’s eyes to things we ought to have noticed, but had not. 

And if we fail to tame the new capitalist mutant rampaging through our societies then we will only have ourselves to blame, for we can no longer plead ignorance,” stated John Naughton in a review published in The Guardian.