What We Are Reading Today: Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C.

Updated 10 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C.

  • The nature of “style as a concept of expression,” an issue that becomes more important given the increasingly multiple styles

AUTHOR: William A. P. Childs

Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C. analyzes the broad character of art produced during this period, providing an in-depth analysis of and commentary on many of its most notable examples of sculpture and painting.
Taking into consideration developments in style and subject matter, and elucidating political, religious, and intellectual context, William A. P. Childs argues that Greek art in this era was a natural outgrowth of the high classical period and focused on developing the rudiments of individual expression that became the hallmark of the classical in the fifth century.
As Childs shows, in many respects the art of this period corresponds with the philosophical inquiry by Plato and his contemporaries into the nature of art and speaks to the contemporaneous sense of insecurity and renewed religious devotion. Delving into formal and iconographic developments in sculpture and painting, Childs examines how the sensitive, expressive quality of these works seamlessly links the classical and Hellenistic periods.


What We Are Reading Today: Making Up Your Own Mind by Edward B. Burger

Updated 10 November 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Making Up Your Own Mind by Edward B. Burger

We solve countless problems — big and small — every day.

With so much practice, why do we often have trouble making simple decisions — much less arriving at optimal solutions to important questions?

Are we doomed to this muddle — or is there a practical way to learn to think more effectively and creatively?

In this enlightening, entertaining and inspiring book, Edward Burger shows how we can become far better at solving real-world problems by learning creative puzzle-solving skills using simple, effective thinking techniques, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Making Up Your Own Mind teaches these techniques — including how to ask good questions, fail and try again, and change your mind — and then helps you practice them with fun verbal and visual puzzles.

The goal is not to quickly solve each challenge but to come up with as many different ways of thinking about it as possible.

As you see the puzzles in ever-greater depth, your mind will change, helping you become a more imaginative and creative thinker in daily life.