Search after German pop star goes missing at sea

In this March 24, 2010 file photo, German pop singer Daniel Kueblboeck poses into the camera in Wiesbaden, Germany. (AP)
Updated 10 September 2018
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Search after German pop star goes missing at sea

  • A military helicopter and a surveillance aircraft were sent to the area, as well as two ships

MONTREAL: Search and rescue workers were actively seeking Sunday a German pop star who went missing while on a cruise off Canada’s coast, the Royal Canadian Navy said.
The 33-year-old pop singer, Daniel Kueblboeck, was believed to have jumped off the AIDAluna cruise ship about 200 kilometers (124 miles) north of St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador, according to the cruise line.
A passenger was seen throwing himself into the sea, and the search of the boat then established that the singer was missing, the cruise line said.
He was traveling on his own, and was not on tour, according to the same source.
An alert was sounded early Sunday.
A military helicopter and a surveillance aircraft were sent to the area, as well as two ships.
“They were dispatched to the area and arrived mid-afternoon,” military spokesman Mark Gough told AFP.
“The search is still going on.”
After dark, the air and sea units had to be reduced due to no visibility. But a smaller Coast Guard craft is continuing the mission overnight into Monday, a Navy spokesman said.
Kueblboeck gained fame in Germany after he took part in 2002 and in earlyu 2003 in a popular national reality show.


Home break-ins by black bears surge in Connecticut suburbs

In this Aug. 2018 photo provided by Tom Bradley, a bear eats from a garbage can outside the Bradley family home, in Canton, Conn. (AP)
Updated 8 min 51 sec ago
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Home break-ins by black bears surge in Connecticut suburbs

  • A study released last year by the University of Connecticut showed the bears are actually choosing to make their homes near people

CANTON, Connecticut: Connecticut environmental officials say the state’s bears are getting bolder.
A wildlife biologist with the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection says there have been about two dozen reports this year of bears breaking into Connecticut homes and businesses, about four times the yearly average.
Paul Rego says many of the 800 or so black bears that now live in the state have very little fear of human interaction.
He suggests the state needs to allow a hunt, to keep the population under control and to help imprint on the bears that interacting with humans is a bad thing.
A study released last year by the University of Connecticut showed the bears are actually choosing to make their homes near people. They find perfect living conditions in what are known as ex-urban areas, where there are plenty of woods, but also homes every acre or two, providing access to those easy food sources such as those trash bags and bird feeders.