‘Context, perspective and facts’ casualties of industry financial squeeze, says Bloomberg co-founder

Bloomberg Editor-in-Chief Emeritus Matthew Winkler talks about the news organization’s local training program. (File Photo / Reuters)
Updated 10 September 2018
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‘Context, perspective and facts’ casualties of industry financial squeeze, says Bloomberg co-founder

LONDON: Arab News Business Editor, Sean Cronin, talks to Bloomberg Editor-in-Chief Emeritus Matthew Winkler about the news organization’s local training program.
Q: What is the next step for the students who go through the course?
A: The course exposes students to the various elements of financial journalism, and introduces them to Bloomberg’s brand of data-driven reporting, based on the “Bloomberg Way,” the students will hear directly from more than 20 Bloomberg journalists and analysts from London and the Middle East, on everything from using social media as a reporting tool and multimedia journalism, to journalistic ethics and principles and covering Middle East economies.
We hope to strengthen their existing interest in pursuing a career in financial journalism, and to inspire them to explore these specific areas further following the completion of the course.
Q:Will any go on to work for Bloomberg?
A: Through this course, and indeed all our global financial training programs, we want to inspire students to pursue a career in financial business and news organizations, whether that is at Bloomberg or elsewhere. We encouraged a number of participants from last January’s course to apply for our global internship programs. Two participants were particularly interested in how we use data across Bloomberg, and recently completed our summer data internship program in London. A third participant will begin a news internship in Dubai later this month.
Q: How many students do you expect to train every year?
A: We expect to train 40 to 50 students in total every year. Thirty students participated in the first edition of the program; this number dropped slightly in the second edition as we have implemented a rigorous application process to ensure we have the strongest candidates.
Q: Do you see core journalistic skills being threatened by financial pressures facing the industry and the churn demanded of reporters?
A: Yes, I believe this is especially the case in broadcast news where context, perspective and facts are casualties of this. This is where accuracy, which is at the heart of the “Bloomberg Way,” becomes particularly important.
Q: Is it becoming more challenging for local and national media to hold organizations accountble, and what can be done to change that?
A: Financial pressures have eroded local news reporting, so there is a lack of accountability when there is no vibrant local press, which in turn leads to limited public discourse.


US judge orders White House to restore press pass to CNN’s Acosta

Updated 16 November 2018
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US judge orders White House to restore press pass to CNN’s Acosta

  • CNN said in a statement on Friday that it “looked forward to a full resolution in the coming days”
  • White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement that Acosta’s credentials would be temporarily restored

WASHINGTON: A US judge on Friday ordered the White House to temporarily restore CNN correspondent Jim Acosta’s press pass, which was revoked after a contentious press conference last week with President Donald Trump.
The White House withdrew Acosta’s credentials last Wednesday in an escalation of the Republican president’s attacks on the news media, which he has called the “enemy of the people.”
US District Judge Timothy Kelly, who is hearing CNN’s lawsuit challenging the revocation, said Acosta’s credentials must be restored while the network’s case is pending.
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement that Acosta’s credentials would be temporarily restored.
“Let’s go back to work,” Acosta said to reporters after the hearing.
But Trump said that “people have to behave” and warned of future court action against reporters who do not.
“If they don’t listen to the rules and regulations, we’ll end up back in court and we’ll win,” Trump said on Friday. “But more importantly, we’ll just leave. And then you won’t be very happy, because we do get good ratings.”
CNN said in a statement on Friday that it “looked forward to a full resolution in the coming days.”
In its lawsuit filed on Tuesday in US District Court in Washington, CNN said the White House violated the First Amendment right to free speech as well as the due process clause of the Constitution providing fair treatment through judicial process. The network asked for a temporary restraining order.
Kelly, a Trump appointee, did not address the First Amendment’s protections for freedom of speech and the press, focusing instead on the due process provision.
“Whatever process occurred within the government is still so shrouded in mystery that the government at oral argument could not tell me who made the initial decision to revoke Mr. Acosta’s press pass,” Kelly said in his verbal ruling.
In court, US government lawyers said there is no First Amendment right of access to the White House and that Acosta was penalized for acting rudely at the conference and not for his criticisms of the president.
The judge said White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders’ initial statement that Acosta was penalized for touching a White House staffer attempting to remove his microphone was “likely untrue and at least partly based on evidence that was of questionable accuracy.”
The day after the Nov. 6 congressional elections, Trump erupted into anger during the news conference when Acosta questioned him about the Russia probe and a migrant caravan traveling through Mexico.
“That’s enough, that’s enough,” Trump told Acosta, as a White House staffer attempted to take the microphone away from the correspondent. “You are a rude, terrible person.”
Sanders had accused Acosta of “placing his hands on a young woman just trying to do her job as a White House intern” and of preventing other reporters from asking questions at the news conference. She called his behavior “absolutely unacceptable.”
Videos of the encounter show Acosta pulling back as the staffer moved to take the microphone at the press conference.
On Friday, Sanders said the White House “will also further develop rules and processes to ensure fair and orderly press conferences in the future. There must be decorum at the White House.”