Snakes on a plate: Vietnam’s coiled cuisine

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This photo taken on August 24, 2018 shows chef Dinh Tien Dung collecting snake blood on a glass of rice wine at a specialty restaurant in Yen Bai province. (AFP)
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This photo taken on August 24, 2018 shows a customer consuming a snake sausage dish served at a specialty restaurant in Yen Bai province. (AFP)
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This photo taken on August 24, 2018 shows Dang Quoc Khanh holding a snake in his breeding farm in Yen Bai province. (AFP)
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This photo taken on August 24, 2018 shows chef Dinh Tien Dung cleaning the snakes at a specialty restaurant in Yen Bai province, Vietnam. (AFP)
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This photo taken on August 24, 2018 shows a cook preparing snake dish at a specialty restaurant in Yen Bai province. (AFP)
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This photo taken on August 24, 2018 shows chef Dinh Tien Dung preparing to cook a snake at a specialty restaurant in Yen Bai province while an assistant looks on. (AFP)
Updated 11 September 2018
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Snakes on a plate: Vietnam’s coiled cuisine

  • It’s delicious, good for your health and good for your bones

YEN BAI, Vietnam: With their meat served up in a wide array of dishes and blood added to rice wine, snakes make a reputedly satisfying — and nourishing — meal in Vietnam.
Caught in the jungles of the north of the country, snake flesh is traditionally believed to help with cooling overheated body temperatures, relieving headaches and easing digestion.
Restaurants will cook it steamed or fried with lemongrass and chilli and serve it with a rice wine mixed with snake blood, said chef Dinh Tien Dung, who works at a restaurant in Yen Bai province three hours northwest of the capital Hanoi.
Holding a snake’s head with one hand, Dinh Tien Dung slit its body near the head with a knife and squeezed blood out of it, dripping it into a cup of rice wine.
“We make use of every part of the snake except its head and its scales,” said the 32-year-old.
Locals believe that only men over 50 should drink snake wine, as younger males are likely to experience “backache or impotence,” said restaurant owner Duong Duc Doc.
As for its flesh, the benefits to eating it are numerous, said snake-catcher Dang Quoc Khanh, a 35-year-old who has been trapping serpents in the jungle since he was a young boy.
“Snake meat is a very good food,” he said, “It’s delicious, good for your health and good for your bones.”
But wildlife expert Ioana Dungler from Four Paws International said killing wild snakes and disturbing the jungles’ ecosystem is unnecessary as global meat production should be sufficient.
“The whole process of these animals ending on a plate or in a drink is very painful... and it’s done for purposes that are not justified,” Dungler told AFP.


Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

Updated 16 November 2018
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Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

  • The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015
  • ‘The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media’

SYDNEY: Rebel Wilson said she was glad she’d stood up to “a bully” despite losing her bid Friday to keep most of the record payout awarded to her in her defamation case against an Australian magazine.
The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015 that she said had painted her as someone who’d lied about her real name, age and childhood in order to make it in Hollywood.
The Supreme Court of Victoria state awarded her an Australian-record payout of $3.4 million (A$4.7 million) after a jury concluded she’d missed out on film roles because of the articles. Wilson had sought $5 million in damages.
But this June the amount was reduced by 90 percent after the magazine’s publishers, Bauer Media, appealed. Victoria’s Court of Appeal said Wilson could not prove economic loss, or that she’d missed out on film contracts as a result of the articles. The court ordered the actress to pay back almost $3 million, and 80 percent of Bauer’s legal costs.
Wilson’s lawyers on Friday sought leave to appeal against the reduction in the High Court — Australia’s highest judicial body — but the application was refused.
“In our opinion there are insufficient prospects that an appeal will succeed,” Justice Virginia Bell said at the court in the national capital, Canberra.
The magazine publisher welcomed the decision. “Bauer Media is invested in its Australian business now more than ever,” Bauer chief executive Paul Dykzeul said in a statement. “Our audience trust our content and our writers and they love our iconic brands like Woman’s Day and Australian Women’s Weekly.”
Wilson, who sat in the front row of the public gallery during the brief hearing, said outside the court she was glad the process had been brought to an end.
“This has been a long fight and a long journey in the courts, but the great thing about today is that it brings it to a definitive end,” she told reporters.
“The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media.”
Wilson said she was proud of herself for “seeing it out right to the bitter end,” and that she was glad the initial jury had “restored my reputation.”
“Today was just about a small point of special damages and for me it was never about the money, it was about standing up to a bully and I’ve done that.”
Wilson is a native Australian best known for her Hollywood roles in the “Pitch Perfect” films and “Bridesmaids.”