To return to Saudi is an honor and a privilege, says Australian ambassador

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Ridwaan Jadwat, the newly appointed Australian ambassador to the Kingdom, expressed his pleasure at being back in Saudi Arabia, when he visited the Arab News headquarters in Riyadh. (AN Photo)
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Ridwaan Jadwat, the newly appointed Australian ambassador to the Kingdom, expressed his pleasure at being back in Saudi Arabia, when he visited the Arab News headquarters in Riyadh. (AN Photo)
Updated 12 September 2018
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To return to Saudi is an honor and a privilege, says Australian ambassador

RIYADH: Ridwaan Jadwat, the newly appointed Australian ambassador to the Kingdom, expressed his pleasure at being back in Saudi Arabia, when he visited the Arab News headquarters in Riyadh. “I came back 15 years after my first posting in 2003. Everyone’s first posting has a special place in their heart as a diplomat. I learned a lot during my first posting here and I was keen to come back. It’s a great honor and privilege for me to come back as the ambassador of Australia.”
He was greeted by Arab News Editor-in-Chief Faisal J. Abbas and given a tour of the new Arab News Riyadh office.
The ambassador, who arrived two months ago, said he could see how society is transforming itself and the evidence of that in Riyadh specifically. He noted the social and cultural changes, such as women taking on a much more significant and prominent place in the country, which he has “been struck by.”
“I really want to work with my team here to build and enhance our relationship ... to see where Australia can support Saudi with Vision 2030 and with some of the other ambitious projects.
“It’s an exciting time for us to work with Saudi Arabia on economic and trade issues.”
Noting that Saudi wants to look beyond oil, the ambassador said: “Australia has a great deal of expertise and experience in things like mining and minerals technology. Saudi Arabia has a great deal of potential in unexplored territory in terms of mining. Australia is a mining superpower.”
Touching on the subject of tourism, he said he “would love to see the number of Saudis visiting Australia as well as studying there increase dramatically.” As the Saudi tourism industry is opening up to the world, he said he would “love to see more Australians visit Saudi.” He had the chance to tour many historical sites in Saudi Arabia and commented on how significant they are.
Only two days ago he visited Al-Masmak fort and Al-Deira souk in Riyadh. “I think people would really appreciate the cultural and historical sites, and Saudi Arabia has a lot to offer,” he said.


FaceOf: Dalma Rushdi Malhas, Saudi equestrian

Updated 28 min 54 sec ago
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FaceOf: Dalma Rushdi Malhas, Saudi equestrian

  • Malhas is the first female athlete from Saudi Arabia to compete at an Olympic-level event
  • Malhas has been riding since she was four

Equestrian Dalma Rushdi Malhas is the first female athlete from Saudi Arabia to compete at an Olympic-level event. She rode at the inaugural Youth Olympic Games in 2010 in Singapore, winning a bronze medal.

She was born in 1992 in Ohio, US. Her mother, Arwa Mutabagani, is also a prominent equestrian. Mutabagani has been a board member at the Saudi Equestrian Federation since 2008, and was the first female appointed to the Saudi Arabian Olympic Committee in 2008.

Malhas has been riding since she was four. At 12 she moved with her mother from Saudi Arabia to Rome to train with her under Italy’s former showjumping national coach, Duccio Bartalucci.

After spending a few years in Rome and obtaining her International Baccalaureate, she moved to join a two-year professional training program at the Forsan Equestrian Center in Chantilly, France.

She participated in Singapore in the 14-18 age group, becoming only the third Saudi Arabian athlete to land an Olympic medal, winning bronze.

After she participated in several competitions abroad, the International Olympic Committee invited her to represent Saudi Arabia.

However, she was disqualified from the Games for failing to meet the minimum eligibility standards, according to the International Equestrian Federation. Also, Caramell KS, Malhas’ horse, suffered an injury in May 2012 and was not expected to recover for the Games in London. 

Malhas participated in the Horse Hurdles Individuals category at the World Equestrian Championships in the US city of Tryon, North Carolina, on Wednesday, alongside more than 60 female equestrians from all over the world.