Study: Middle Eastern actors ignored by TV

Olivia Newton-John
Updated 12 September 2018
0

Study: Middle Eastern actors ignored by TV

  • The study warned that such depictions can contribute to the rise of anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant sentiment in American society

LOS ANGELES: Actors and characters of Middle Eastern and North African descent are either ignored by TV or stereotyped, according to a new study by a California-based university.
The few such actors who get work are largely confined to playing tyrants and terrorists, said the study released Monday.
One percent of regularly seen TV series actors have roots in countries including Egypt and Turkey. But estimates show about 3 percent of the US population, 10 million people, are from the region, said the study’s lead author, Biola University associate professor Nancy Wang Yuen.
Researchers who examined 242 scripted prime-time series on broadcast, cable and streaming during the 2015-16 season found that between 90 percent and 97 percent had no characters of Middle Eastern or North African ethnicity.
When those characters do appear, 78 percent are tyrants or trained terrorists, agents or soldiers, the study said. Most speak with obvious foreign accents.
The study warned that such depictions can contribute to the rise of anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant sentiment in American society.


Home break-ins by black bears surge in Connecticut suburbs

In this Aug. 2018 photo provided by Tom Bradley, a bear eats from a garbage can outside the Bradley family home, in Canton, Conn. (AP)
Updated 25 September 2018
0

Home break-ins by black bears surge in Connecticut suburbs

  • A study released last year by the University of Connecticut showed the bears are actually choosing to make their homes near people

CANTON, Connecticut: Connecticut environmental officials say the state’s bears are getting bolder.
A wildlife biologist with the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection says there have been about two dozen reports this year of bears breaking into Connecticut homes and businesses, about four times the yearly average.
Paul Rego says many of the 800 or so black bears that now live in the state have very little fear of human interaction.
He suggests the state needs to allow a hunt, to keep the population under control and to help imprint on the bears that interacting with humans is a bad thing.
A study released last year by the University of Connecticut showed the bears are actually choosing to make their homes near people. They find perfect living conditions in what are known as ex-urban areas, where there are plenty of woods, but also homes every acre or two, providing access to those easy food sources such as those trash bags and bird feeders.