US ‘likely’ has taken over as the world’s top oil producer

Pump jacks operate in front of a drilling rig in an oil field in Midland. The US is now likely the biggest producer of oil in the world. (Reuters)
Updated 12 September 2018
0

US ‘likely’ has taken over as the world’s top oil producer

  • America “likely surpassed” Russia in June and August.
  • US production has soared in recent years because of techniques including hydraulic fracturing

The United States may have reclaimed the title of the world’s biggest oil sooner than expected.
The US Energy Information Administration said Wednesday that America “likely surpassed” Russia in June and August after jumping over Saudi Arabia earlier this year.
The agency says, however, that’s based on preliminary estimates.
If those estimates are right, it would mark the first time in more than two decades that the US has led in output.
US production has soared in recent years because of techniques including hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” the use of chemicals, sand, water and high pressure to crack rock formations deep below ground, releasing more oil and natural gas.
Fracking is driving a drilling boom in the Permian Basin under Texas and New Mexico.


Full-blown US, China trade war to cost jobs, growth and stability — WTO’s Azevedo

Updated 25 September 2018
0

Full-blown US, China trade war to cost jobs, growth and stability — WTO’s Azevedo

  • ‘A continued escalation of tensions would pose an increased threat to stability, to jobs and to the kind of growth that we are seeing today’
  • ‘There would be no winners from such a scenario and every region would be affected’

BERLIN: A full-blown trade war would have serious effects on global economic growth and there would be no winners of such a scenario, the director-general of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Roberto Azevedo, said on Tuesday.
Speaking at a Berlin industry event against the backdrop of growing trade tensions between China and the US, Azevedo said: “The warning lights are flashing. A continued escalation of tensions would pose an increased threat to stability, to jobs and to the kind of growth that we are seeing today.”
A full-blown global trade war with a breakdown in international trade cooperation would reduce global trade growth by around 70 percent and GDP growth by 1.9 percent, Azevedo said.
“There would be no winners from such a scenario and every region would be affected,” Azevedo said. The European Union itself would have about 1.7 percent taken off its GDP growth, he said, adding: “Clearly, we cannot let this happen.”
Azevedo pointed to several reform proposals that addressed trade-distorting practices and the WTO’s existing mechanisms to resolve trade disputes, adding that members had to agree on which reforms they wanted to focus on.
“Clearly, this informed debate is gaining significant momentum and that is positive,” Azevedo said, adding the G20 summit in Buenos Aires in November would be crucial to agree on the next steps to safeguard the rules-based free trade order.
“Of course, the system can be better, in fact it must be better. But it’s nonetheless vital. So while we work to improve it and ensure that it’s more responsible to evolving economic needs, we must also preserve what we have — and I count on your support to that end,” he said.