Saudi leadership is a source of pride for Muslims, says Tahir Ashrafi

Saudi Ambassador to Pakistan Nawaf bin Saeed Al-Malki received Maulana Tahir Mehmood Ashrafi at the Saudi Embassy in Islamabad on Wednesday. (SPA)
Updated 13 September 2018
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Saudi leadership is a source of pride for Muslims, says Tahir Ashrafi

  • The Saudi leadership and its security institutions are a source of pride for us: Maulana Tahir Mehmood Ashrafi

ISLAMABAD: Maulana Tahir Mehmood Ashrafi, the president of the All Pakistan Ulema Council, has congratulated King Salman for the excellent services provided to pilgrims every year, which allow them to perform Hajj rituals with as much ease and comfort as possible. His comments came during a meeting with Saudi Ambassador to Pakistan Nawaf bin Saeed Al-Malki at the Kingdom’s embassy in Islamabad on Wednesday.

After performing holy pilgrimage in the Kingdom recently as part of King Salman’s Hajj and Umrah Program, Ashrafi told Arab News that on behalf of the PUC he expressed solidarity with the Kingdom in the Saudi-led intervention in Yemen, Operation Decisive Storm. The Ulema also issued a fatwa against the Houthi militia and Daesh terrorists in the region.

“The Saudi leadership and its security institutions are a source of pride for us, as they are protecting this holy land,” he said.

Ashrafi studied at Lahore’s Jamia Qasmia and Jamia Zia Ul Uloom, before completing the Dars-e-Nizami at Jamia Ashrafia. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Punjab University, and went on to earn a master’s degree in Arabic and Islamic studies from the same institution.


Yemen sides agree Hodeidah 'ceasefire mechanism' as envoy meets Prince Khalid bin Salman

Updated 37 min 12 sec ago
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Yemen sides agree Hodeidah 'ceasefire mechanism' as envoy meets Prince Khalid bin Salman

  • UN envoy Martin Griffiths held a "productive meeting" with Saudi Arabia's deputy defense minister Prince Khalid bin Salman
  • UN Security Council votes unanimously to extend its ceasefire observation mission in Hodeidah by six months

JEDDAH: Yemen's warring sides have agreed on a "mechanism and new measures to reinforce the ceasefire and de-escalation" around the flashpoint port of Hodeidah, as well as technical aspects of a troop pullback, the United Nations said on Monday.
Representatives of the Yemeni government and Houthi militia were picked up at different locations by a UN ship and held talks in the Red Sea off Yemen, the first such meeting since February, a UN statement said.

The agreement came as the UN special envoy to Yemen Martin Griffiths said he held a "productive meeting" with Saudi Arabia's deputy defense minister Prince Khalid bin Salman on Monday in Jeddah.

Tweeting about the meeting, Griffiths said he discussed with Prince Khalid how to keep Yemen out of ongoing regional tensions and how to make progress in the implementation of the Stockholm agreement with the support of the Kingdom.

Also Monday, the UN Security Council voted unanimously to extend its ceasefire observation mission in Hodeidah by six months, until Jan. 15, 2020.

It also called on Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to deploy a full contingent of observers "expeditiously" in the mission, which is mandated to have 75 staff but currently only has 20 on the ground.
The text adopted  Monday stressed that the UN mission should "monitor the compliance of the parties to the ceasefire in Hodeida governorate and the mutual redeployment of forces from the city of Hodeida and the ports of Hodeida, Salif and Ras Issa."
The monitors should work with the parties so that the security of the area "is assured by local security forces in accordance with Yemeni law."
It also called on all parties involved in the Hodeida Agreement to support UN efforts by ensuring the safety of the monitors and affording all personnel and supplies swift and unfettered movement.
Under the agreement made in Stockholm at the end of 2018, all warring factions were supposed to have withdrawn their troops from the strategic port city in western Yemen.
Last month, Houthi militants balked at providing visas for UN observers stationed off the coast on board a UN vessel.
 

*With reuters and AFP