The Hadid sisters are all over NYFW

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Gigi Hadid models fashion from the Oscar de la Renta spring 2019 collection during Fashion Week in New York on Sept. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
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Models Bella Hadid, left, and Gigi Hadid attend the BoF 500 Gala held at One Hotel Brooklyn Bridge during New York Fashion Week on Sept. 9, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)
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Model Bella Hadid attends the BoF 500 Gala held at One Hotel Brooklyn Bridge during New York Fashion Week on Sept. 9, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)
Updated 13 September 2018
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The Hadid sisters are all over NYFW

  • US-Palestinian sisters Bella and Gigi Hadid proved they are in high demand at New York Fashion Week

DUBAI: The US-Palestinian Hadid sisters proved they are in high demand at New York Fashion Week by walking the runway for luxury label Oscar de la Renta on Tuesday.

Bella kicked things off in a fringed, sarong-like skirt with a tulip print and a white, one-armed top. And Gigi finished the show in a long, sheer black lace gown — also with one arm free — with delicate ruffles running up the leg, the Associated Press reported.

Two years into their tenure at the helm of Oscar de la Renta, designers Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia continue to seek new ways to inject a more relaxed vibe into the label — while maintaining its famous craftsmanship.

This week, the pair put on a rooftop runway show that felt like a sunny Mediterranean vacation — well, once it actually stopped drizzling. There were bold prints, lots of fringe, crocheted dresses and loose, comfy caftans taking their place among the elegant, structured gowns the label is best known for.

The two moods of the collection could perhaps best be sampled by looking at the show’s opening and closing garments, each modeled by a famous Hadid sister.

Backstage after the high-profile show, which drew celebrities like Nicki Minaj (and her mother), Kate Beckinsale and Dianna Agron.

The designers agreed that each season, they’ve experimented just a bit more with the aesthetic of the label’s legendary founder. This time, they thought about all the countries they’d traveled to for inspiration, and then actually made a print from a map of them, which appears on several garments.

“You can see, it goes from Turkey, to Morocco, to China,” Kim said, pointing to a photo on her look board backstage.

A number of the garments had a relaxed, looser fit, and Kim said that had something to do with the weather this year. “It was so hot this summer that I think I personally felt the need for looser clothes,” she said.

Chief among them: Kaftans, perhaps the ideal vacation garment. “We always had kaftans but we never really showed them,” said Kim. “But I’m starting to realize that that’s all I want to wear in summer.”

Colors included a lot of neutrals, but also bold colors like bright canary yellow, and a new terra cotta red. Speaking of canaries, one highly whimsical touch was a white birdcage purse — with a wallet inside, resembling a bird. Not exactly your traditional de la Renta accessory.

Earlier in the week, the Hadid sisters walked in Prabal Gurung’s show.

The designer, who sent models from 35 countries around the globe down his runway on Sunday, chose to represent a world where “all humanity reigns,” according to the Associated Press.  

The fashionable crowd was also treated to the designer’s first-ever menswear collection. Among his men was Anwar Hadid, joined in the show by his supermodel sisters.


Miles Davis and all that jazz

Miles Davis teaches actress Jeanne Moreau to play the trumpet. (AFP)
Updated 19 September 2018
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Miles Davis and all that jazz

  • Thankfully, the tapes were rolling on Dec. 19, 1970 — just one more historic evening when Miles changed music forever, before tearing up the rulebook again in pursuit of that most quixotic muse

ROTTERDAM: Miles Davis once claimed to have “changed music five or six times,” and while a man known for neither understatement nor modesty, some argue that the jazz icon sold himself short — biographer John Szwed once traced at least nine musical subgenres either born or shaped by Davis’ innovations. 

The revolutionary shopping list includes inventing cool-jazz in the 1940s, spawning hard bop, modal jazz and third-stream in the 1950s, and pioneering post-bop in the 1960s. However, the stylistic sea change Davis devoted most blood, sweat and tape toward were the ‘70s adventures in fusion most often epitomized by “B*****s Brew”, the first of ten dense double-LPs (plus two singles) recorded in just five years — which over 44 sides of vinyl explored and/or anticipated jazz-rock, funk, ambient, minimalism, worldbeat, psychedelic, space-jazz and even techno.

Trippy stuff, for sure, but not always easily listenable. Not the case with the misleadingly titled “Live-Evil” (1971) — a part-studio, mostly live set which captures Davis’ increasingly oblique electric permutations at their most fun, and funky. The bulk of the 102-minute runtime documents a one-night encounter with guest guitarist John McLaughlin, whose furious fretwork conceals an unusually ragged looseness and bluesy simplicity.

Such a raw approach suits the thick, squelchy grooves conjured by electric bassist Michael Henderson — recently recruited from Aretha Franklin’s band — grounding the untethered attack of drummer Jack DeJohnette’s crazed rock rhythms.

Recorded at the height of his boxing obsession, there’s a controlled aggression to Davis’ playing — the hurried rhythms of jabs and parries, ducks and dives — his horn harshly amplified through a wah-wah guitar pedal in a wholehearted Hendrix homage.

What little harmony there is comes from Keith Jarrett, whose overdriven organ scurries lend a frazzled energy and cerebral counter-balance. Soon after Jarrett — now the most renowned solo pianist on the planet — would quit and disavow electronic instruments altogether.

Thankfully, the tapes were rolling on Dec. 19, 1970 — just one more historic evening when Miles changed music forever, before tearing up the rulebook again in pursuit of that most quixotic muse.