UAE confirms law allowing foreigners to obtain long-term residencies for retirement

The UAE cabinet has approved a law that will allow foreigners to obtain long-term residencies in the Emirates after they retire. (AFP)
Updated 17 September 2018
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UAE confirms law allowing foreigners to obtain long-term residencies for retirement

  • The law will provide special residency-visa privileges for expatriate retirees over the age of 55 years for a period of five years, with the possibility of renewal
  • It is part of the UAE government’s drive to boost economic growth in the country

DUBAI: The UAE cabinet has approved a law that will allow foreigners to obtain long-term residencies in the Emirates after they retire, the prime minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum said on Sunday.
Dubai Media Office announced the significant move on their Twitter page. It is part of the UAE government’s drive to boost economic growth in the country.

The law will provide special residency-visa privileges for expatriate retirees over the age of 55 years for a period of five years, with the possibility of renewal, according to specific conditions, WAM reported.

According to the WAM statement, the law, which will be in effect from 2019, “outlines the requirements to qualify for the long-term visa such as having an investment in a property worth AED2 million ($544,000), or having financial savings of no less than AED1 million, or having an active income of no less than AED20,000 per month.”

 


Jordan to host Yemen talks on prisoner exchange

Updated 56 min 1 sec ago
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Jordan to host Yemen talks on prisoner exchange

  • A follow-up committee will discuss implementing the deal agreed in UN-brokered peace talks last month in Sweden

AMMAN: The next stage of the fragile Yemen peace process will take place in Jordan.

The government in Amman agreed on Tuesday to a UN request to host a meeting between the Yemeni government and Iran-backed Houthi militias to discuss a prisoner swap deal that would allow thousands of families to be reunited.

A follow-up committee will discuss implementing the deal agreed in UN-brokered peace talks last month in Sweden. 

The agreement to free prisoners simultaneously was part of confidence-building measures that included a plan to withdraw from the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah.

The two sides exchanged lists of about 15,000 prisoners for a swap agreed at the start of the Sweden talks and delegates said it would be conducted via the Houthi-held Sanaa airport in north Yemen and the government-held Sayun airport in the south.

The process would be overseen by the UN and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). The operation will require the Saudi-led military coalition to guarantee that air space is secure for flights, the ICRC said.

The warring parties in Yemen have so far refused to talk face-to-face during two meetings to discuss the redeployment of forces from Hodeidah, UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

Retired Dutch general Patrick Cammaert, the head of the monitoring team, had to shuttle between government and Houthi representatives in different rooms.

Dujarric said Cammaert was trying to find “a mutually acceptable way forward” to redeploy forces from Hodeidah and the smaller ports of Salif and Ras Isa.

“Recent discussions have been constructive” and Cammaert “continues to encourage the parties to resume the joint meetings in order to finalize a mutually agreed redeployment plan,” Dujarric said.

UN envoy Martin Griffiths said last week there would be a new round of talks in January but diplomats said he was now looking to February.