Turkey will increase troop numbers in Cyprus: Erdogan

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures during a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin (unseen) in the Bocharov Ruchei residence in the Black Sea resort of Sochi in Sochi on September 17, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 17 September 2018

Turkey will increase troop numbers in Cyprus: Erdogan

  • Erdogan added that Turkey had no need for a naval base on Cyprus
  • He expressed impatience over the Cyprus issue, saying “this business would have been solved”

ISTANBUL: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vowed that Ankara will increase rather than reduce its troops numbers in Cyprus, a move that could further set back attempts to reunify the divided Mediterranean island.
In comments published in Turkish media Monday, Erdogan added that Turkey had no need for a naval base on Cyprus as mooted in some reports but could establish such a facility if it was necessary from a “psychological” point of view.
“No, we are not going to reduce the numbers of our troops. We will increase them, we are not going to decrease them,” he told Turkish reporters traveling back with him from a trip to Azerbaijan.
He expressed impatience over the Cyprus issue, saying “this business would have been solved” if the Greek Cypriots had backed unification in an April 2004 referendum on a plan put forward by the late former UN secretary general Kofi Annan.
While Turkish Cypriots were overwhelmingly in favor of the plan, Greek Cypriots voted against.
“Henceforth we will implement the formula that we have declared for ourselves,” said Erdogan, without elaborating.
Cyprus has been divided since the 1974 Turkish invasion which occupied the northern third of the island in response to a Greek military junta-sponsored coup.
Turkey is believed to maintain around 35,000 troops in northern Cyprus, although the military does not give official figures.
The withdrawal — or drastic reduction — of Turkey’s military presence is seen as key to any reunification plan being acceptable to the Greek Cypriot side.
Some conservative Turkish media have also reported in recent weeks that Turkey was planning to open a naval base on Cyprus, a move that would likely deal a terminal blow to any reunification hopes.
But Erdogan said “we have no need to build a base there,” noting that unlike Greece, Turkey was just “minutes away” from the coast of Cyprus.
But he appeared to leave the door open to such a move as a way of making a political statement.
“This issue just has a psychological dimension. In this respect, if we felt the need, we could establish a base. Our presence there is important,” Erdogan said.
There were high hopes at the beginning of 2017 that UN-backed talks could clinch a breakthrough in the long-running stalemate on reuniting the island.
But the deadlock has not been broken and analysts say rapid progress is unlikely for the moment as Erdogan reaches out to the nationalist electorate in Turkey.


Bashir defense asks Sudan court for bail release

Updated 13 min 45 sec ago

Bashir defense asks Sudan court for bail release

  • Bashir, wearing a traditional white gown, sat in the same metal cage he appeared in on Monday when his trial on graft charges opened
  • The former Sudanese leader is also wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague over his role in mass killings in the western region of Darfur

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s deposed military ruler Omar Al-Bashir appeared in court Saturday for the second hearing of his corruption trial, during which his defense asked for his release on bail.
Bashir, wearing a traditional white gown, sat in the same metal cage he appeared in on Monday when his trial on graft charges opened.
The judge in Khartoum Saturday heard three witnesses, two of them investigators who searched Bashir’s residency after his ouster and the other a banker.
“We ask the court to release the accused on bail,” Bashir’s lawyer Hashem Abu Bakr said, to which the judge answered he would examine a written request.
After the hearing, as a massive security convoy escorted the 75-year-old Bashir back to prison, two opposing groups of demonstrators had gathered.
One group of a few dozen protesters were chanting slogans for Bashir to face justice not just over corruption but for his role in the the country’s deadly conflicts.
“Bashir is a killer” and “He has to face justice,” chanted some of the demonstrators.
Another smaller group had turned out in support of the deposed Islamist general, who was forced from power by relentless protests in April after 30 years in power.
While the sight of Bashir sitting inside a cage in a courtroom was unthinkable only months ago, many in Sudan and abroad have warned that this trial should not distract from the more serious indictments he faces.
The former Sudanese leader is wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague over his role in mass killings in the western region of Darfur.