Woody Allen’s wife Soon-Yi weighs in on Mia Farrow

“Mia described me as ‘elegant,’” Soon-Yi said. “It was the only positive thing she said about me.” (AP)
Updated 17 September 2018
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Woody Allen’s wife Soon-Yi weighs in on Mia Farrow

  • Mia “has taken advantage of the #MeToo movement and paraded Dylan as a victim. And a whole new generation is hearing about it when they shouldn’t,” Soon-Yi said
  • Now 47 and married for more than 20 years, Soon-Yi was a 21-year-old college freshman in 1991 when she began an affair with Allen

NEW YORK: Woody Allen’s wife, Soon-Yi Previn, broke a long silence to defend the filmmaker against allegations of sexual abuse brought by his daughter, Dylan, speaking out on the running feud between her mother, Mia Farrow, and her husband.
“What’s happened to Woody is so upsetting, so unjust,” Previn said in a rare interview with New York Magazine.
Mia “has taken advantage of the #MeToo movement and paraded Dylan as a victim. And a whole new generation is hearing about it when they shouldn’t,” she said.
In the article by Daphne Merkin, a longtime friend of Allen’s, Soon-Yi discusses her difficult childhood relations with her adopted mother, portraying her as dismissive and abusive.
“Mia described me as ‘elegant,’” she is quoted as saying. “It was the only positive thing she said about me.”
Now 47 and married for more than 20 years, Soon-Yi was a 21-year-old college freshman in 1991 when she began an affair with Allen.
Farrow, the director’s long-time partner on screen and off, discovered the affair a year later, causing an angry public break that set the rest of the family against Allen and Soon-Yi.
In a television interview in January, Dylan, Allen’s adopted daughter with Farrow, revived accusations that her father molested her in August 1992 when she was seven years old.
In a statement to New York Magazine, Dylan said it was “offensive” of Soon-Yi to assert that she had been pushed to accuse Allen in the wake of the #MeToo movement.
“This only serves to revictimize me,” Dylan said. “Thanks to my mother, I grew up in a wonderful home, filled with love, that she created.”
After the article’s publication, Dylan also tweeted a statement signed by several of Mia Farrow’s biological and adopted children, attesting that their mother has always been “a caring and giving parent.”
“We reject any effort to deflect from Dylan’s allegation by trying to vilify our mom,” it said.
Ronan Farrow, a son of Mia Farrow and Allen who won a Pulitzer prize for investigative articles in the New Yorker that helped propel the #Me Too movement, denounced Merkin’s article as “shameful.”
“I owe everything I am to Mia Farrow,” he tweeted.
“As a brother and a son, I am angry that New York Magazine would participate in this kind of a hit job, written by a longtime friend and admirer of Woody Allen,” he said, adding, “Survivors of abuse deserve better.”


Japan’s ‘Uncle Olympics’ fan dies just short of 2020 Games

Naotoshi Yamada, above, was planning to attend the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo in 2020. (Reuters/File)
Updated 18 March 2019
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Japan’s ‘Uncle Olympics’ fan dies just short of 2020 Games

  • The man attended all summer games since 1964
  • He often wore a golden hat when he attended the games

TOKYO: A Japanese Olympic mega-fan who attended every summer games since Tokyo in 1964 has died, just over a year before his home city was to host its second Olympics.
Tokyo businessman Naotoshi Yamada, 92, who died on March 9 from heart failure, was a national celebrity in his own right with his repeated, gleeful appearances in Olympic stands.
“Uncle Olympics,” as he came to be known, was an omnipresent fixture for Japanese TV watchers cheering on the Japan team at the “Greatest Show On Earth.”
Often sporting a gold top hat, kimono, and a beaming smile, Yamada also became a darling of the international media.
“After 92 years of his life spent cheering, Naotoshi Yamada, international Olympic cheerleader, was called to eternal rest on March 9, 2019,” said his web site, managed by a firm he founded.
Born in 1926, Yamada built a successful wire rope manufacturing business, and also expanded his portfolio to include the hotel and real estate sectors.
But away from work, his passion was for sport, particularly the Olympics.
He did not miss a summer games since 1964, taking in Mexico City, Munich, Montreal, Moscow, Los Angeles, Seoul, Barcelona, Atlanta, Sydney, Athens, Beijing, London and Rio de Janeiro.
For good measure, he also attended the winter games when it rolled into Nagano in 1998, and told local media of his strong desire to attend the 2020 Tokyo Games.
Yamada saw the first Tokyo Olympics when he was 38.
But his passion was truly ignited during the 1968 Mexico City Games, according to his website.
He donned a kimono and a sombrero hat and loudly cheered for a Mexican 5000-meter runner, mistaking him for a Japanese athlete.
Local spectators embraced the scene and loudly cheered for Japanese athletes in return, leading to an electrifying show of support that went beyond nationality, his website said.
“He saw the awesome power of cheering, and was mesmerised by it ever since,” it said.