Saudi Grains Organization to import 630,000 tons of wheat

SAGO has completed procedures for tenders to import 1,500,000 tons of fodder barley from world market. (SPA)
Updated 17 September 2018

Saudi Grains Organization to import 630,000 tons of wheat

  • 11 international companies have been awarded the contract for supplying through 17 vessels at different ports in the Kingdom

JEDDAH: Saudi Grains Organization (SAGO) has completed measures to import 630,000 tons of wheat during 2018 from European Union countries, Australia, and South and North America, except Canada.
The fourth batch will arrive during November-December on board 10 ships through the Kingdom’s ports on the Arabian Gulf and the Red Sea, according to sources.
Ahmed bin Abdul Aziz Al-Faris, SAGO governor, said the batch comes as an extension of the Kingdom’s plan to cover the local demand for wheat and preserve its strategic stocks.
Last week, SAGO said it has completed procedures for tenders to import 1,500,000 tons of fodder barley from EU countries, Australia, North and South America (excluding Canada) and the Black Sea.
Al-Faris said that 11 international companies have been awarded the contract for supplying through 17 vessels at different ports in the Kingdom.
He said the move comes as an extension of a plan to cover the local demand for fodder barley.
SAGO aims to maintain its status as one of the most important sectors in the field of food security by following the best practices to develop and enhance its activities.


VIDEO: Saudi mountaineer Mona Shahab on the charitable cause that helped drive her to the summit of Everest

Updated 21 August 2019

VIDEO: Saudi mountaineer Mona Shahab on the charitable cause that helped drive her to the summit of Everest

  • Shahab vows to continue her close friend's charitable work helping underprivileged children in Egypt

JEDDAH: A Saudi mountaineer who climbed Mount Everest this year has described how her commitment to her late friend’s charity helped drive her to the top of the world’s highest mountain.

 

 

Mona Shahab reached the highest point of the world on May 23 as part of a team of Arab women.

In an emotional video published this week, the mountaineer breaks down as she describes how her close friend and fellow mountaineer Marwa Fayed died in 2013 after complications during childbirth.

Shahab vowed to continue Fayed’s charitable work helping underprivileged children in Egypt, and used her Everest ascent to raise money for the cause.

“I’m doing it to help Marwa Fayed’s Toy Run give 300 children in underprivileged areas in Egypt a chance to be change agents in their communities,” Shahab says in the video posted by filmmaker and mountaineer Elia Saikaly, who documented their ascent.

In an interview with Arab News days before her successful ascent, Shahab spoke about how she hoped her ascent would inspire Saudi women.

“Saudi women can, Saudi women will, reach whatever heights they set their mind and heart to,” she said.

To help Shahab reach her fundraising goal, go to https://www.gofundme.com/f/Everest-for-365-Deeds-Forward