Stars get tickled pink at the Emmys

TV star Yara Shahidi wore a Gucci gown. AFP
Updated 19 September 2018
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Stars get tickled pink at the Emmys

  • There were princess looks and stars pretty in pink, liquid metallics and in reliable red for TV’s big night at the Emmy Awards
  • TV star Yara Shahidi wore a sugar pink Gucci gown

DUBAI: There were princess looks and stars pretty in pink, liquid metallics and in reliable red for TV’s big night at the Emmy Awards.
TV star Yara Shahidi, whose father is Iranian-born, wore a sugar pink Gucci gown, complete with floral embellishments and crystal detailing on the floor-length skirt.
Claire Foy in custom Calvin Klein by Appointment, Jessica Biel in ruffled Ralph & Russo and Scarlett Johansson in Balmain represented in white Monday, as did RuPaul in a jacket adorned with Andy Warhol designs of black Statues of Liberty on one side.
Yellow came in a variety of shades, from neon (Regina King) to mustard (16-year-old Gaten Matarazzo) to gold (Gwendoline Christie) to the lightest Easter hue, worn by a few.
And then there was Tracee Ellis Ross. Love her or scorn her in voluminous Valentino Haute Couture with a puffy top that surely set a world record.
“I almost shed a tear when she hit the carpet,” Julee Wilson, fashion and beauty director for Essence magazine, told the Associated Press of Shahidi’s “black-ish” co-star. “She cements her status as a style icon every time she gets dressed. But then again, she was birthed by Diana Ross, so it makes sense.”
Other best-dressed votes for Ellis Ross rolled in after the parade of fashion on the Emmys gold carpet in Los Angeles.
“If you plan to make the carpet all yours, it makes sense to go all out and do the volume of Valentino Haute Couture,” said Avril Graham, executive fashion and beauty editor for Harper’s Bazaar. “Absolutely perfect.”
It was bright pink. It had volume to spare all the way to the ground.
Erin Cunningham, senior fashion editor for the millennial-focused style site Refinery29, lauded Ellis Ross for never holding back, fashion wise, but also among her top looks was actress Poppy Delevingne in seafoam, ruffle-caped Giambattista Valli couture. It included an oversized silhouette that began just above the knee.
“The color is unexpected and a rarity on the red carpet, and she topped the look off with a cute ribbon bow in her hair,” Cunningham said.
Delevingne also sported $200,000 worth of Amwaj citrine and diamond earrings, plus rings.
Cunningham noted pink had a renaissance in shades that felt less saccharine than usual, including Ellis Ross and Shahidi.
“There was Tracee’s magenta dress, Leslie Jones’ holographic Christian Siriano suit (in pink and blue) and Thandie Newton’s one-sleeved bubblegum pink gown,” she said, referring to Newton’s one-shoulder Brandon Maxwell that looped at the neck in a long cape effect on one side.
Supermodel Gigi Hadid wore the look on Maxwell’s recent New York Fashion Week runway.
So where do these people shop? Well, while others ripped their outfits off runways or wore custom gowns, Meghan Mullally purchased her Carolina Herrera sheer black look with floral detailing online. Kristen Bell wore a classic white column gown from an unexpected brand, Solace London.
While basic black is always abundant, Wilson had kind words for Keri Russell of “The Americans,” for elevating the color in Zuhair Murad couture. It was beaded black crepe with a peplum ruffle in feathers atop a black pleated chiffon skirt.


Startup of the Week: Coco Sabon’s natural skincare

Coco Sabon. (Supplied)
Updated 21 May 2019
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Startup of the Week: Coco Sabon’s natural skincare

  • Coco Sabon’s customers are mostly Arab women aged between 20 and 40, “though we have many loyal fans that span different age groups and come from all over the world”

RIYADH: The healing and relaxing powers of nature are at the heart of Coco Sabon’s philosophy.
Launched by Dr. Cynthia Mosher — an American living in Riyadh — the skincare firm is committed to sourcing high-quality, natural oriental ingredients that provide the skin with gentle care and nourishment.
“I launched Coco Sabon in November 2015 at Alfaisal University’s first bazaar,” she said.
Mosher, who completed a bachelor of science in natural health sciences, said she hoped to do something more than simply diagnose illnesses and prescribe treatments. She also wanted to have time for other important things and people, so now she is working as an educator, training a new generation of medical students.
She encourages people to make healthy choices when it comes to ingredients they use on their bodies.
“I fell in love with formulating and creating beautiful, natural skincare products. I continued my creative journey while pursuing my medical degree, which deepened my commitment to develop ‘do no harm’ skincare based on natural ingredients,” she said.
“Layered with my admiration of Arabian culture, the rich regional ingredients, and my passion for integrative medicine, I developed a deep sense of holistic self-care that guides my formulations. My love for the fragrances, natural remedies and skincare routines of the Middle East are the heart and soul of Coco Sabon.”
There is a growing demand for Coco Sabon products. “After years of requests from family and friends to make and sell my products, I tested the waters, so to speak. We sold out of everything that day.”
She added: “About six weeks later we were invited to participate at the Gathering in Al-Bujairi in January 2016. We had a crowd of customers nonstop for three days and again sold out of everything. It was a decisive weekend. Coco Sabon was born and we have not looked back since.”
Mosher’s family and friends offered encouragement, but one of her strongest supporters was her best friend, Audrey Wilkinson. She said: “Audrey was my supporter, helper and adviser. She now works with me, formulating and producing our candles, cremes and face care line.”
Coco Sabon’s customers are mostly Arab women aged between 20 and 40, “though we have many loyal fans that span different age groups and come from all over the world.”
The brand offers a wide range of products, including soap, bath bombs, scrubs, cremes, face and body oils, perfumes and candles.
“Everything is produced by hand in small batches here in Riyadh using natural, safe and organic ingredients, sourced locally wherever possible,” Mosher said.
Coco Sabon believes in supporting local businesses and in sourcing the best ingredients possible. The store also designs its packaging and hand packages, labels and wraps each item, selling through an online store (cocosabon.com), Instagram, WhatsApp, and local popup shop events.
Mosher has also started offering workshops on making her products.
“Some might think that to be unwise because I could very well teach a future competitor,” she said. “Well, that’s true for the medical students I teach now. Should I withhold my knowledge for fear of them becoming better doctors and doing better? Of course not. The more knowledge we put out there, the better our society will be. The workshops also help build community.
“I connect with people who are curious, who want to learn how to create and how to make good choices for their health. I welcome workshop students young and older (my youngest so far was just 6 years old), and I encourage them to take what they learn and use it to improve their lives and that of others around them. If they make a business out of doing so, then good for them. We all have something to offer the world,” she said.
Mosher is happy that she created a job she loves. “Sometimes I miss practicing clinical medicine, but I remind myself that I am helping people make healthier choices for their bodies, their minds, their souls and the planet,” she said.
“That’s a special kind of medicine that I believe can help heal the world.”