Peace and safety will prevail in Syria, says KSRelief chief

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Abdullah Al-Rabeeah discussed the situation in the camp, as well as current and future humanitarian projects there. (SPA)
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Abdullah Al-Rabeeah discussed the situation in the camp, as well as current and future humanitarian projects there. (SPA)
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Abdullah Al-Rabeeah discussed the situation in the camp, as well as current and future humanitarian projects there. (SPA)
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Abdullah Al-Rabeeah discussed the situation in the camp, as well as current and future humanitarian projects there. (SPA)
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Abdullah Al-Rabeeah discussed the situation in the camp, as well as current and future humanitarian projects there. (SPA)
Updated 18 September 2018
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Peace and safety will prevail in Syria, says KSRelief chief

  • Abdullah Al-Rabeeah discussed the situation in the camp, as well as current and future humanitarian projects there
  • Saudi Arabia, represented by KSRelief, is keen to alleviate the suffering of Syrian refugees in Jordan

JEDDAH: The supervisor general of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) visited Jordan’s Zaatari camp for Syrian refugees to check on the progress of KSRelief’s projects there.
Abdullah Al-Rabeeah discussed the situation in the camp, as well as current and future humanitarian projects there, with officials at the camp and representatives of organizations working there.
The camp is located in northeast Jordan, about 70 km from the capital Amman, and hosts 70,000 Syrian refugees, accounting for 22 percent of their total number in the country.
Saudi Arabia, represented by KSRelief, is keen to alleviate the suffering of Syrian refugees in Jordan, and to ease the burden on the country’s government, said Al-Rabeeah.
“In the next few days of this visit, we will see the signing of deals for more programs and projects with our partners in international humanitarian organizations,” he added.
Al-Rabeeah expressed hope that peace and safety will prevail in Syria so refugees can return to their country.
At Zaatari, he and his delegation visited the distribution center of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the catering center of the World Food Program (WFP).
Al-Rabeeah contributed to distributing 2,000 bags to Syrian students at the primary school of the Saudi complex in the camp.
The distribution is part of a project in Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon to provide 450,000 school bags that include all students’ needs at the start of every school year. The total value of the project is $4.437 million.
Al-Rabeeah met with distinguished students and children with special needs to encourage them and give them moral support. He also toured KSRelief’s 15 specialized clinics in Zaatari.
He attended the cultural training program provided by the MiSK Foundation in the camp, and inaugurated the Advanced Saudi Center for Community Education and Training, which includes computer programing, basic sciences, health, tailoring, weaving and handicrafts.
Al-Rabeeah visited Syrian families in Zaatari and listened to their stories. He also visited the handicrafts exhibition in the camp, which includes paintings and sculptures that reflect refugees’ emotions and creativity.
He visited the exhibition of the Saudi Training Center for Handicrafts and Recycling, patronized a ceremony to honor outstanding students, and gave them awards.
Meanwhile, Al-Rabeeah has signed a joint program for treating cancer patients from Yemeni and Syrian refugees at Jordan’s King Hussien Cancer Center.
He visited the headquarters of the King Hussien Cancer Center in Amman on Tuesday, where he met several of the foundation’s leaders.
Al-Rabeeah met her royal highness Princess Ghida Talal, the Chairperson of the Board of Trustees of the King Hussein Cancer Foundation.
His excellency discussed with Talal ways of boosting cooperation, and signed the joint agreement which aims to provide diagnostic and therapeutic services to cancer patients.


Top five trends shaping KSA retail industry

Saudis visit the International Coffee and Chocolate Exhibition held at the Riyadh International Convention and Exhibition Center in the capital Riyadh on December 4, 2017. (AFP)
Updated 7 min 38 sec ago
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Top five trends shaping KSA retail industry

  • Artificial intelligence can identify consumer preferences with great accuracy

RIYADH: The Kingdom has a vast, young, tech-savvy population that is shifting behavior in Saudi Arabia, according to Ahmed Reda, MENA consumer industry leader for Ernst and Young (EY).
EY worked with more than 200 business leaders, futurists and industry experts through its FutureConsumer.Now program (FCN) to map the buying habits of consumers. “We asked questions such as how will consumers shop, eat, stay healthy, live, use technology, play, work and move in the future?” Reda said.
Here are some of the key trends powering the shift in consumer behavior and the retail industry in the GCC’s largest consumer base.
Data analytics and AI transforming traditional retail models: The new breed of GCC consumer expects a highly personalized experience. This will be even more critical as brand loyalty declines among GCC consumers. As analytics tools become increasingly sophisticated, the value of personalized data will grow. Artificial intelligence can identify consumer preferences with great accuracy.
Brands need to implement omnichannel strategies: In markets such as Saudi Arabia, which has some of the most affluent consumers, omnichannel strategies (any time, any place) are vital for companies to craft a user experience that cuts across online shopping, social media, mobile apps and conventional stores.
Physical stores still have a place: Online shopping has reduced the need for people to visit shops. Physical stores will still be a powerful asset if they are used for more than shopping. Retailers have a portfolio of well-located spaces that can be repurposed.
Rise of e-commerce: Physical stores won’t disappear, but the high penetration of smartphones and digital services has transformed the behavior of GCC consumers.
Value-seeking behavior after VAT: In a market that has been tax-free, the introduction of VAT, even at a relatively low rate of 5 percent, has caused a shift in consumer behavior. The average Saudi consumer is more cost-conscious than ever. Companies that can tap into additional value through economies of scale, or provide greater convenience, will reap the rewards.