What We Are Reading Today: Stripped Bare: The Art of Animal Anatomy by David Bainbridge

Updated 21 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Stripped Bare: The Art of Animal Anatomy by David Bainbridge

  • Stripped Bare brings together some of the most arresting images ever produced, from the earliest studies of animal form to the technicolor art of computer-generated anatomies

For more than 2,000 years, comparative anatomy — the study of anatomical variation among different animal species — has been used to make arguments in natural philosophy, reinforce religious dogma, and remind us of our own mortality. This stunningly illustrated compendium traces the intertwined intellectual and artistic histories of comparative anatomy from antiquity to today.

Stripped Bare brings together some of the most arresting images ever produced, from the earliest studies of animal form to the technicolor art of computer-generated anatomies. David Bainbridge draws on representative illustrations from different eras to discuss the philosophical, scientific, and artistic milieus. He vividly describes the unique aesthetics of each phase of anatomical endeavor, providing new insights into the exquisite anatomical drawings of Leonardo and Albrecht Dürer in the era before printing, Jean Héroard’s cutting and cataloging of the horse during the age of Louis XIII, the exotic pictorial menageries of the Comte de Buffon in the 18th century, anatomical illustrations from Charles Darwin’s voyages, lavish symmetries of ErnstHaeckel’s prints, and much, much more.

Featuring a wealth of breathtaking color illustrations throughout, Stripped Bare is a panoramic tour of the intricacies of vertebrate life as well as an expansive history of the peculiar and beautiful ways humans have attempted to study and understand the natural world.


What We Are Reading Today: More Than Enough by Elaine Welteroth

Updated 23 June 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: More Than Enough by Elaine Welteroth

The positivity of Elaine Welteroth and her life's journey so far is truly inspirational.
"In this part-manifesto, part-memoir, the revolutionary editor who infused social consciousness into the pages of Teen Vogue explores what it means to come into your own—on your own terms," said a review in goodreads.com.
“For generations women have been made to feel like we’re not good enough, not smart enough, not pretty enough — in my case not black enough, not white enough — too old, too young, too loud, too quiet. I mean, there are so many messages that are threatening to keep us small,” Welteroth explained in a recent radio interview.
According to The New York Times, Welteroth decided to write the book because “if I am going to be held up as a trailblazer in my career for the things that I’ve been able to do and the opportunities I’ve had, well I better be doing everything in my power to make sure that I am leaving that trail with some signposts along the way that make it easier and less daunting and less confusing for the next generation of young leaders and female leaders of color who are coming up behind me.”