Secretary-General of Arab League warns Palestine situation critical

Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul Gheit gestures during a joint conference. (File/AFP)
Updated 20 September 2018
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Secretary-General of Arab League warns Palestine situation critical

  • The United States recently announced that it is ending all funding for the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency, UNRWA
  • The Secretary-General stated that this deprives Palestinians of any political solution in the future

The Secretary-General of the Arab League, Ahmed Aboul Gheit warned of the deteriorating situation of Palestinians in occupied territories, pointing out that the current situation is cause for concern.

Aboul Gheit said in a statement: “The US administration is exerting unprecedented pressure on the weakest party in this conflict, and it is not understood how such an approach could eventually lead to peace, which actually distances us from the two-state solution.”

The United States recently announced that it is ending all funding for the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency, UNRWA. Washington’s aid cuts to the Palestinians also affects cancer patients and peace groups.

The Secretary-General stated that this deprives Palestinians of any political solution in the future and puts them under unprecedented pressure, both at a political level and on a humanitarian level with regards to the standard of daily life of millions of people living in occupied West Bank and Gaza.

Aboul Gheit stressed that the explosion of the situation in Palestine will not be in the interest of any party, and that there is a responsibility on the international community to prevent the situation to deteriorate even more.

Aboul Gheit blamed the US, calling Washington responsible for creating this state of anger and despair among Palestinians, stating that the situation has negative consequences for stability in the region.


Book promoting national dialogue in conflict-hit countries published

Launch of the Arabic version of ‘National Dialogue Handbook- A Guide for Practitioners’ in Beirut. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 4 min 8 sec ago
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Book promoting national dialogue in conflict-hit countries published

  • The Berghof Foundation initiated Lebanese national dialogue efforts in 2007
  • The aim of the guide is to “provide solid guidance and practical support to those who explore national dialogue

BEIRUT: Two European peace-building institutes have jointly published an Arabic-language manual aimed at promoting national dialogue in countries plagued by war and extremism.

The Berghof Foundation, a not-for-profit peace-building organization that initiated Lebanese national dialogue efforts in 2007 and embarked on similar initiatives in Yemen and Sudan, collaborated with Swiss research institute Swisspeace to publish the guide.

Firas Khairallah, Berghof representative in Beirut, told Arab News that the aim of the guide is to “provide solid guidance and practical support to those who explore national dialogue as a means to transcend political obstacles or scenarios of divisive conflict or turbulent transition.”

At a recent meeting held in Lebanon, Germany’s ambassador to Lebanon, Georg Birgelen, stressed that “anything is better than war.”

“As German, we know war all too well,” he told politicians and officials at a recent meeting held by the foundation. “This is why avoiding conflict is key to German policy-making.”

Swiss ambassador to Lebanon, Monika Schmuts Kirgoz, said: “National dialogue and consensus-building are the subjects of the hour in the Middle East”, adding that “courage is needed to advance dialogue and reach agreements.”

“National dialogues provide an effective way to overcome internal faults and to rebuild relations between state and institutions,” said one official from the foundation. “Where national dialogue succeeds, social contracts are born.”

While peace-building initiatives hang in the balance in Lebanon, Berghof Foundation and Swisspeace officials concurred that Tunisia proved the most successful model for national dialogue in the region.

“The dialogue was the beginning of a new chapter in the history of Tunisia,” said Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Ouided Bouchamaoui, who founded the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet.

“We forced all parties to participate in the dialogue and held 1,700 hours worth of dialogue and one-on-one talks. We received many threats and faced problems with state actors, but we always reverted to dialogue. We set a new constitution and held elections. Our mission ended in 2014. We now have elected institutions.”

Bouchamaoui added: “The experience was successful thanks to a strong civil society and high education levels, which make Tunisians think 100 times before resorting to violence. Still, economic challenges are mounting.”

In Jordan, where extremist rhetoric among youth facing soaring unemployment rates has become rampant in recent years, the foundation instigated dialogue to strengthen the culture of tolerance.

Musa Al-Maaitah, Jordan’s political affairs minister and founder of the Jordanian Social Democratic Party, said that democracy essentially boils down to the right to disagree.

“Our problem is that we want to take without giving,” he said. “Political parties always think that they have the truth, but the fact is that no one has one absolute form of truth.”

In Libya, matters were not so simple and talks fell through. 

“The Libyans elected a constituent assembly for the first time in 40 years and they were happy, but the Libyan people wanted a UN-sponsored dialogue,” said Tariq Mitri, the former head of the UN Support Mission in Libya. “They thought the UN held the carrot and the stick.”

He pointed out that one of the problems in Libya was trying to root out the other side under the slogan “no democracy for the enemies of the nation.” 

“Armed groups have strong sway over political parties,” he said. “This is why it was difficult getting them on one table.”

In Lebanon, meanwhile, efforts hang between success and failure.

“The dialogue broke down in Lebanon after failure to implement the constitution,” said former President Michel Suleiman. 

“Civil society must be included in dialogue. What we lack is the implementation of a social contract in accordance with a constitution. The only way out is limit weapons supply to the state, revisit agreements with Syria and form a committee to abolish sectarianism.”

Former Prime Minister Fuad Siniora concurred. “Domination, marginalization, external and internal interventions, provocation, assassinations, intimidation, blackmail, populism and all sorts of other forms of sabotage rampantly increased between 2006 and 2018,” he said.

As former Minister Yassine Jaber put it: “We need to agree on the rule of law because implementation of the law is not a point of view.”