Hosny’s El Badla marks a first for Egyptian cinema in Saudi Arabia

Clocking a screen time of 100 minutes and directed by Tamer Hosny, the film’s plot revolves around a college student. (Supplied)
Updated 20 September 2018
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Hosny’s El Badla marks a first for Egyptian cinema in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: Following on the heels of “Kaala” — the first Hindi film to be successfully screened in the Kingdom — Majid Al-Futtaim on Thursday held the first screening of an Egyptian film in Saudi Arabia with the action comedy hit, “El Badla.”
Clocking a screen time of 100 minutes and directed by Tamer Hosny, the film’s plot revolves around a college student — played by Hosny himself — who attends a costume party dressed as a police officer. Hosny soon finds himself in a tricky situation after his plan backfires and he becomes the subject of a criminal investigation for false impersonation.
Cameron Mitchell, CEO of Majid Al-Futtaim Cinemas, said that Egypt’s rich history of producing quality entertainment has led to a high demand for Egyptian films, not only in Saudi Arabia but across the region as well. 
“We are proud to be the first operator that brings Egyptian content to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and we will continue to offer a range of movies that appeal to a variety of cultures that we cater to,” Mitchell said.
The Kingdom lifted a decades-long ban on screening films by opening its first cinema on April 18.


What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

Updated 16 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

  • The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe

This thoroughly revised third edition of an award-winning book offers a keen insight into how the scientific revolution happened and why. Covering central scientific figures, including Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, and Bacon, this new edition features greater treatment of alchemy and associated craft activities to reflect trends in current scholarship.

The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe. Peter Dear traces the revolution in thought that changed the natural world from something to be contemplated into something to be used, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Concise and readable, this book is ideal for students who are studying the scientific revolution and its impact on the early modern world. The first edition was the winner of the Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize of the History of Science Society.