Rare photos give glimpse into life of late Saudi Arabia founder King Abdulaziz

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King Abdulaziz Public Library published pictures of the late founder King Abdulaziz, on the occasion of Saudi Arabia’s 88th National Day. (SPA)
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King Abdulaziz Public Library published pictures of the late founder King Abdulaziz, on the occasion of Saudi Arabia’s 88th National Day. (SPA)
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King Abdulaziz Public Library published pictures of the late founder King Abdulaziz, on the occasion of Saudi Arabia’s 88th National Day. (SPA)
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King Abdulaziz Public Library published pictures of the late founder King Abdulaziz, on the occasion of Saudi Arabia’s 88th National Day. (SPA)
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King Abdulaziz Public Library published pictures of the late founder King Abdulaziz, on the occasion of Saudi Arabia’s 88th National Day. (SPA)
Updated 20 September 2018
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Rare photos give glimpse into life of late Saudi Arabia founder King Abdulaziz

JEDDAH: On the occasion of Saudi Arabia’s 88th National Day a public library released pictures of King Abdulaziz bin Abdulrahman Al-Saud, who has become a great memory to this day.
The King Abdulaziz Public Library, one of the Kingdom’s major cultural institutions, maintains a vast historical collection of King Abdulaziz, his life and personal accomplishments, as well as galleries of pictures of the Kingdom’s past and present portrayed in various books, documents and manuscripts.
The library maintains a wide variety of images documenting Saudi Arabia’s history and life for researchers and historians, showing the stages of construction and establishment.
They also portray the position of the founding king, which can be seen through his interviews and meetings with a large number of officials, ranging from presidents, kings, ministers, ambassadors and international personalities concerned with the issues of the Arab world and Middle East events.
A series of photographs reveal how King Abdulaziz was keen to meet with citizens and guide them and meet tribal elders and people in direct and open meetings, including King Farouk of Egypt, late British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and late US President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Other pictures portray the founder’s care for education and his appreciation of scientists and students alike.
The images also capture scenes of life in Makkah, Madinah, the north-west of the Kingdom, and its heritage and archaeological sites, which shed light on the region’s history.
The collection reflects many of the architectural arts of the region during that period, as reflected in the designs of the mosques, palaces and buildings, as well as arts, fashion, social customs, and handicrafts.


Italian Language Week celebrated in Jeddah

Updated 7 min 26 sec ago
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Italian Language Week celebrated in Jeddah

  • Italian Language Week was launched in 2001 by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation and the Accademia della Crusca

JEDDAH: The Consulate General of Italy in Jeddah celebrated the 18th Italian Language Week by hosting conference on Wednesday titled Language, Newspapers, Storytelling: Words and Graphics in Digital World. The event, at the Italian Cultural Center, was held under the patronage of the Italian president, in partnership with Arab News.

The conference was one of a series of events in Jeddah to mark the global celebration, which takes place each year during the third week of October and is promoted by the Italian cultural and diplomatic network. About 1,000 events are being held by the Italian community worldwide.

The conference included a seminar titled Italian Language and Visual Communication, which was presented by Adriano Attus, a graphics director at leading Italian financial newspaper Sole 24 ORE. Frank Kane, a distinguished Arab News columnist with 40 years of experience in the Western and Middle Eastern press, also took part and the seminar was moderated by Prof. Leonardo Romeid, vice dean of the Jeddah College of Advertising at The University of Business and Technology.

Attus, an editorial designer for the past 25 years, spoke about how the graphics in a newspaper are “at the service of the text,” and how creative forms of data visualization, including illustrations, diagrams and graphs, can help readers better understand and interact with the text. He also described the dramatic changes in the past decade to the ways in which newspapers are presented, and how more-visual content is becoming increasingly necessary and affecting the look of newspapers.

This year’s conference is the 10th hosted by the consulate in Saudi Arabia, and a different language-related theme is chosen each year, said Elisabetta Martini, the consul general in Jeddah. Last year’s theme was cinema, as expectations grew that theaters would reopen in the Kingdom.

“The tool we communicate the Italian language through is the network, the internet,” said Martini. “So we organized a series of seminars on how the network changes the language and changes the Italian language in particular. We are promoting the Italian language, Italian newspapers, and Italian designs.

“This year we are also promoting Saudi theater, and we are hosting a play next week titled ‘Head Over Heals Going to Italy.’ In this way, we are bridging cultures.”

Italian Language Week was launched in 2001 by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation and the Accademia della Crusca. They were subsequently joined in the initiative by Switzerland, where Italian is one of the official languages.

The Jeddah conference ended with a movie and pizza night, including a screening of the film “Finding Camille.”

“It is a recent (2017) Swiss-Italian movie,” said Charles Lardy, adviser to the political and economic sections at the embassy of Switzerland in Riyadh. “It tells the story of (a family dealing with) a severe case of Alzheimer’s. A woman’s father, who used to be a war journalist, is losing his memory and she decides to take him trip to relive parts of his life to help him regain his memory.

“The Italian language is the third language spoken in Switzerland, by 20 percent of the population, after French, which is spoken by 25 percent, and German, by 65 percent. We have a very old tradition of federalism that represents every part of our society, and we try to promote that.”