Europeans at UN urge Israel not to demolish Palestinian village

A general view of the Palestinian Bedouin village of Khan Al-Ahmar in the Israeli occupied West Bank on Sept. 13, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 21 September 2018
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Europeans at UN urge Israel not to demolish Palestinian village

  • The eight countries are France, Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, Britain, Belgium, Germany and Italy
  • They warn the demolition ‘would severely threaten the viability of the two-state solution’

UNITED NATIONS: Eight European countries at the United Nations including five Security Council members on Thursday called on Israel to reverse its decision to demolish a Palestinian village in the West Bank.
Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Belgium, Poland and the Netherlands warned that the demolition of the village of Khan Al-Ahmar “would severely threaten the viability of the two-state solution.”
“We therefore call upon the Israeli authorities to reconsider their decision to demolish Khan Al-Ahmar,” the countries said in a joint statement released ahead of a council meeting on the Middle East.
On Sept. 5, Israel’s supreme court upheld an order to raze the village on grounds that it was built without the proper permits.
On Sept 13, Israeli troops removed caravans in the early morning from near the Bedouin village which they have orders to demolish despite international criticism, officials said.
The community of roughly 200 people is located in a strategic spot near Israeli settlements and along a road leading to the Dead Sea.
There have been warnings that continued Israeli settlement construction in that area could divide the West Bank in two and cut it off from Jerusalem, killing off the prospect of amassing contiguous land for a viable future Palestinian state.


UN investigation delves into Daesh’s crimes against Yazidis

Yazidi activist Nadia Murad won the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize. (AFP)
Updated 13 December 2018
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UN investigation delves into Daesh’s crimes against Yazidis

  • The team began its work in August, a year after it was approved the UN Security Council
  • The investigation aims to collect and preserve evidence of acts by Daesh in Iraq that may be war crimes

LONDON: A UN investigation into atrocities committed against Yazidis and others in Iraq will do more than simply gather information that will molder in an archive, the probe’s leader said on Wednesday, it will help bring perpetrators to justice.

The team, led by British lawyer Karim Asad Ahmad Khan began its work in August, a year after it was approved the UN Security Council.

Speaking on the sidelines of a London event celebrating Yazidi activist Nadia Murad — who won the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize —  Khan said the investigation will get into full gear in 2019.

“We will be pushing forward with greater capacity next year once we have a budget from the United Nations,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

The investigation aims to collect and preserve evidence of acts by Daesh in Iraq that may be war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide. In September 2017 — after a year of talks with Iraq — the UN council adopted a resolution asking UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to create the team “to support domestic efforts” to hold the militants accountable.

The evidence gathered is primarily for use by Iraqi authorities.

Whether that evidence will then be shared with international courts, will “be determined in agreement with the Government of Iraq on a case-by-case basis,” according to the resolution.

“This mandate was not created to create simply an archive that would gather dust,” said Khan.

“Our bid is ... to ensure that the best possible evidence is presented, is preserved, is collected. The necessary investigations are committed so that those who committed these horrendous acts are subjected to the vigour of the law.”

UN experts warned in June 2016 that Daesh was committing genocide against the Yazidis in Syria and Iraq, destroying the minority religious community through killings, sexual slavery and other crimes.

Supporters of the Yazidi cause have expressed irritation at delays the probe has faced.

“Four years have passed since the crimes of genocide committed against Yazidis but we have seen no justice as yet for the victims and survivors,” Karwan Tahir, the Kurdish regional government’s representative in Britain told the London event.

About 7,000 women and girls were captured in northwest Iraq in August 2014 and held by Daesh in Mosul where they were tortured and raped.

Murad, a young Yazidi woman who was enslaved and raped by Islamic State fighters in Mosul in 2014, and international human rights lawyer Amal Clooney have long pushed Iraq to allow UN investigators to help.