UK warns there will be no Brexit deal unless EU softens on Irish border

What the EU was asking in and around Northern Ireland was simply impossible for any UK government to accept, Britain’s Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said. (AFP)
Updated 21 September 2018
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UK warns there will be no Brexit deal unless EU softens on Irish border

  • Britain is due to leave the EU on March 29, yet little is clear
  • Some rebels have vowed to vote against a possible Brexit deal

LONDON: Britain will leave the EU without a deal unless the bloc’s leaders soften their position on the Irish border, Transport Secretary Chris Grayling told the BBC.
EU leaders abruptly cautioned May on Thursday that unless she gave ground on trade and the Irish border by November they are ready to cope with Britain crashing out.
“At the moment what the European Union is asking in and around Northern Ireland is simply impossible for any UK government to accept. And actually, if they stick with that position, there will be no deal,” Grayling said.
“There’s tough language and actually a deal is done at the last. And I’m still confident that we will reach agreement,” he added.
Britain is due to leave the EU on March 29, yet little is clear: There is, so far, no divorce deal, rivals to May are circling and some rebels have vowed to vote against a possible Brexit deal.


Ninth lawmaker quits Britain’s opposition Labour Party

Updated 55 min 7 sec ago
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Ninth lawmaker quits Britain’s opposition Labour Party

  • Corbyn, a supporter of Palestinian rights and critic of the Israeli government, has previously been accused by some of failing to tackle anti-Semitism in the party. He denies the allegation

LONDON: British lawmaker Ian Austin resigned from the opposition Labour Party on Friday, the ninth person to do so this week, saying it was “broken” and had been taken over by the “hard left.”

Austin said he was appalled at the treatment of Jewish lawmakers who had taken a stand against anti-Semitism and that the “the party is tougher on the people complaining about anti-Semitism than it is on the anti-Semites.”

“The Labour Party has been my life, so this has been the hardest decision I have ever had to take, but I have to be honest and the truth is that I have become ashamed of the Labour Party under (leader) Jeremy Corbyn,” he told the Express and Star newspaper.

“I could never ask local people to make Jeremy Corbyn Prime Minister.”

Corbyn has promised to drive anti-Semitism out of the party.

Austin said he did not currently have any plans to join The Independent Group in parliament, launched by seven of his former Labour colleagues on Monday and since joined by an eighth as well as three former members of the governing Conservatives.

A Labour lawmaker since 2005 and a former government minister, Austin supports Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal and is not in favor of holding a second referendum, putting him at odds with the other Independent Group members.