Iran adhering to nuclear deal: British PM

British Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement on Brexit negotiations with the European Union, at 10 Downing Street, in London, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP)
Updated 23 September 2018
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Iran adhering to nuclear deal: British PM

  • “From what we see, we believe that it is doing that,” Theresa May told CBS
  • But there are other issues outside the deal that also need to be dealt with, she said

WASHINGTON: Iran is adhering to its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal and the accord — repudiated by the United States — should stay in place, Britain’s prime minister said in an interview broadcast on Sunday.
“From what we see, we believe that it is doing that,” Theresa May told CBS.
“We believe that that should stay in place. And others, involved in putting that deal together believe that it should stay in place,” May said in excerpts of an interview shown on “Face the Nation” that was to air in full Monday on “This Morning.”
But there are other issues outside the deal that also need to be dealt with, she said.
“Looking at the issue of ballistic missiles. Looking at — the way in which — Iran is acting in the region — to destabilize the region. We need to address those issues,” May said.
May’s interview came as world leaders geared up for a week of high-stakes diplomacy at the UN General Assembly, which is set to be dominated by North Korea and Iran.
On Wednesday, President Donald Trump will for the first time chair a Security Council meeting on non-proliferation and weapons of mass destruction that will focus heavily on Iran — likely triggering a clash with other big powers.
Earlier this year, Trump pulled the US out of the deal it reached with Iran and five other countries in 2015. That accord lifted sanctions against Tehran in exchange for restrictions on its nuclear program.
Now, the US is reimposing those sanctions.
Other parties to the deal have argued that it is working and should stay in place, while the International Atomic Energy Agency has said Iran is complying with the accord.


More than half of Albanians would like to emigrate

Updated 19 October 2018
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More than half of Albanians would like to emigrate

  • The country’s potential migration has grown from 44 percent in 2007 to 52 percent in 2018
  • Study shows those mulling migration now prefer Germany and the US

TIRANA: More than half of Albania’s population would like to move to richer countries with better schooling, a study showed on Friday.
The study, led by Russell King of the University of Sussex and Albanian researcher Ilir Gedeshi, found that the country’s potential migration had grown from 44 percent in 2007 to 52 percent in 2018.
Since Albania toppled communism in 1991, more than 1.4 million Albanians, nearly half the current population of the Balkan country, have emigrated mostly to neighboring Italy and Greece and less to the Britain, Germany and the United States.
The study showed economic motives were still the main factor, but less so, and that those mulling migration now prefer Germany and the US.
Some 65,000 Albanians applied for asylum in Germany in 2015-16, with most of them rejected as it began welcoming Syrians fleeing war at home. Germany has since begun welcoming doctors and nurses, almost all new graduates.
As the global and economic crisis since 2008 hit the economies of Italy and Greece, home to about one million Albanians, remittances to Albania, key to alleviating poverty, shrunk by one third and 133,544 migrants came back home.
“The unemployed, unskilled and uneducated were potential migrants earlier. Now the skilled, the educated with a job and good economic standing want to migrate,” Gedeshi told Reuters.
“We also found out economic reasons mattered less because people now want to migrate for better education. A group also wants to leave because they see no future in Albania,” he added.
Given the rising educational profile of potential migrants, the study recommended Albania sought agreements on “managed skilled migration, always bearing in mind the dangers of brain and skills drain.”
“Efforts should also be made to improve and broaden the structure of employment and business opportunities in Albania so that fewer people are pessimistic about their future in Albania and see migration as the ‘only way out’,” it added.