400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

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Divers are seen during the discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck, in Cascais in this handout photo released September 24, 2018. (Reuters)
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Divers are seen during the discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck, in Cascais in this handout photo released September 24, 2018. (Reuters)
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Divers are seen during the discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck, in Cascais in this handout photo released September 24, 2018. (Reuters)
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Divers are seen during the discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck, in Cascais in this handout photo released September 24, 2018. (Reuters)
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Divers are seen during the discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck, in Cascais in this handout photo released September 24, 2018. (Reuters)
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People look at pictures of artefacts found on a shipwreck discovered of Lisbon's coast and displayed at Santo Antonio Fort in Sao Joao do Estoril, in the outskirts of Lisbon, on September 24, 2018. (AFP)
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People watch the pictures during a news conference regarding the announcement of the discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck, in Cascais, Portugal September 24, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 26 September 2018
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400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

  • Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak

CASCAIS, Portugal: Archaeologists searching Portugal’s coast have found a 400-year-old shipwreck believed to have sunk near Lisbon after returning from India laden with spices, specialists said on Monday.
“From a heritage perspective, this is the discovery of the decade,” project director Jorge Freire said. “In Portugal, this is the most important find of all time.”
In and around the shipwreck, 40 feet (12 meters) below the surface, divers found spices, nine bronze cannons engraved with the Portuguese coat of arms, Chinese ceramics and cowry shells, a type of currency used to trade slaves during the colonial era.
Found on Sept. 3 off the coast of Cascais, a resort town on the outskirts of Lisbon, the shipwreck and its objects were “very well-preserved,” said Freire.
Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak.
In 1994, Portuguese ship Our Lady of the Martyrs was discovered near Fort of Sao Juliao da Barra, a military defense complex near Cascais.
“For a long time, specialists have considered the mouth of the Tagus river a hotspot for shipwrecks,” said Minister of Culture Luis Mendes. “This discovery came to prove it.”
The wreck was found as part of a 10-year-old archaeological project backed by the municipal council of Cascais, the navy, the Portuguese government and Nova University of Lisbon.


Snakes in office force Liberia’s president to work from home

Updated 19 April 2019
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Snakes in office force Liberia’s president to work from home

  • President George Weah was told to stay away until the Foreign Affairs building can be fumigated
  • Black snakes were seen this week briefly emerging from a hole in a wall of the building’s reception area

MONROVIA, Liberia: A spokesman says Liberia’s president is working from home after two snakes were found in the building that contains his office.
Deputy press secretary Smith Toby tells The Associated Press that former international soccer star and President George Weah was told to stay away until the Foreign Affairs building can be fumigated. He is expected back in the office on Monday.

Weah was a superstar on the pitch in the mid-1990s, particularly during his spell in Italy with AC Milan. (Getty Images)

The black snakes were seen this week briefly emerging from a hole in a wall of the building’s reception area. Liberia is home to poisonous snakes and officials are not taking chances.
The deputy press secretary says the fumigation has begun to take care of “crawling and creeping things.”
Weah, who was FIFA’s 1995 player of the year, assumed the presidency in January 2018.