Saudi real estate valuers to benefit from RICS’ stamp of approval

Real estate valuers in Saudi Arabia are set to have their industry credentials further boosted following a preliminary agreement signed with the UK-headquartered Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyor (RICS). (Shutterstock)
Updated 25 September 2018
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Saudi real estate valuers to benefit from RICS’ stamp of approval

  • Deal to open up new opportunities in the Saudi market for chartered surveyors
  • RICS has accredited at least 118,000 professionals working in the development and management of land, real estate, construction and infrastructure

LONDON: Real estate valuers in Saudi Arabia are set to have their industry credentials further boosted following a preliminary agreement signed with the UK-headquartered Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyor (RICS).
Under the terms of the memorandum of understanding [MoU), members of the Saudi Authority for Accredited Valuers (Taqeem) are to benefit from training courses and qualifications approved by RICS.
RICS has accredited at least 118,000 professionals working in the development and management of land, real estate, construction and infrastructure.
It is expected the newly formed partnership will see the two parties work together to ensure their members reach internationally recognized standards of valuation which will bring greater transparency to Saudi Arabia’s property market and help boost investor confidence in the sector.
“Ths MoU paves the way to an agreement that recognizes Taqeem real estate designated members as RICS members after mapping educational, experience and membership requirements of each respective organizations,” said Sultan Al Jorais, Secretary General of Taqeem in a statement on Sept 24.
The Taqeem real estate training program will be considered as a RICS ‘approved’ and ‘fit for purpose’ course, he said, while RICS chartered valuers are also set to be granted interim membership of Taqeem.
“We believe that this MoU also provides a great opportunity for RICS qualified members to enter the Saudi market which will add value to the profession,” said Al Jorais.


South Korea imports no Iran oil in November despite sanctions waiver

Updated 28 min 14 sec ago
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South Korea imports no Iran oil in November despite sanctions waiver

SEOUL: South Korea did not import any Iranian oil for the third straight month in November, customs data showed on Saturday, even though it has a waiver from sanctions targeting crude supplies from the Middle Eastern country.
South Korea and seven other countries were in early November granted temporary waivers from US sanctions that kicked in that month over Tehran’s disputed nuclear program.
But it kept imports at zero as buyers have been in talks with Iran over new contracts, with industry sources previously saying they expected arrivals to resume in late January or February.
With no Iranian cargoes arriving for three months, South Korea’s imports of oil from the nation were down 57.9 percent at 7.15 million tons in January-November, or 157,009 barrels per day (bpd), the customs data showed. That compares to nearly 17 million tons in the same period in 2017.
South Korea is usually one of Iran’s major Asian customers. Although the exact volumes it has been allowed to import under the waiver have not been disclosed, sources with knowledge of the matter say it can buy up to 200,000 bpd, mostly condensate.
Condensate is an ultra light oil used to make fuels such as naphtha and gasoline.
But as Iranian condensate supply has been limited due to the sanctions and rising domestic demand in Iran, South Korean buyers have been looking for alternatives from places such as Qatar.
In total, South Korea imported 12.71 million tons of crude oil in November, up 1.2 percent from 12.59 million tons a year earlier, according to the data.
South Korea’s crude oil imports from January to November inched up 0.6 percent from the year before to 131.23 million tons.
Final data on November crude oil imports is due later this month from state-run Korea National Oil Corp. (KNOC).