Lebanon’s parliament approves Arms Trade Treaty

In this photo released by the Lebanese Parliament Media Office, Lebanese lawmakers attend a legislative session, at the Lebanese parliament building, in Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. (AP)
Updated 25 September 2018
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Lebanon’s parliament approves Arms Trade Treaty

  • Hezbollah legislator Ali Ammar walked out of the parliament Tuesday, saying it “infringes on the weapons of the resistance”
  • The 2014 treaty seeks to regulate international trade in conventional arms and prevent illicit trade

BEIRUT: Lebanon’s parliament has ratified the international Arms Trade Treaty, angering Hezbollah legislators, some of whom walked out in protest.
The 2014 treaty seeks to regulate international trade in conventional arms and prevent illicit trade. Hezbollah legislator Ali Ammar walked out of the parliament Tuesday, saying it “infringes on the weapons of the resistance.”
After Lebanon’s 15-year civil war ended in 1990, Hezbollah was allowed to keep its weapons since it was fighting Israeli forces occupying parts of southern Lebanon.
Hezbollah today has a massive arsenal including tens of thousands of rockets and missiles. The group sent thousands of its fighters to Syria to fight along President Bashar Assad’s forces.
Prime Minister designate Saad Hariri said after the treaty was approved that it has nothing to do with Hezbollah’s weapons.


Jordan links deadly blasts to militant cell

Updated 15 February 2019
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Jordan links deadly blasts to militant cell

  • Analysis of the site found the blasts were caused by "homemade explosives buried in the ground matching the type used by a terrorist cell in Al-Fuhais" last August
  • The Salt region was the scene of heavy clashes between gunmen and security forces after the attack which targeted a security patrol at a music festival

AMMAN: Jordan said Friday that two deadly explosions which rocked the Salt region northwest of the capital Amman were apparently linked to a militant cell.
A security source had previously told AFP that old mines were behind Thursday's blasts which killed a farmer and three members of the security forces.
But analysis of the site found the blasts were caused by "homemade explosives buried in the ground matching the type used by a terrorist cell in Al-Fuhais" last August, government spokeswoman Jumana Ghneimat said.
She was referring to an August 11 bomb attack on a security patrol in the nearby town of Al-Fuhais that killed a police sergeant and wounded six others.
The Salt region was the scene of heavy clashes between gunmen and security forces after the attack which targeted a security patrol at a music festival.
Four security force members and three "terrorists" were killed during a raid on a militant hideout a day after the blast.