Deadline passes, Palestinians brace for West Bank demolition

This Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018 photo shows a general view of the location where people from a Bedouin hamlet Khan al-Ahmar are supposed to move to near the West Bank village of Abu Dis. (AP)
Updated 01 October 2018

Deadline passes, Palestinians brace for West Bank demolition

  • The Israeli-imposed midnight deadline has passed for Khan Al-Ahmar’s residents to evacuate on their own or face forced removal
  • Israel says the encampment of corrugated shacks outside an Israeli settlement was illegally built and in an unsafe location near a major highway

KHAN AL-AHMAR, West Bank: Palestinians residents of a West Bank hamlet braced on Monday for an Israeli demolition of their homes as activists arrived to help them resist in case Israeli troops moved in to evict them.
Many spent the night sleeping in a school courtyard or keeping vigil as the Israeli-imposed midnight deadline passed for Khan Al-Ahmar’s residents to evacuate on their own or face forced removal and the demolition of their homes. However, it was unlikely this would happen at least before the end of a Jewish holiday at sundown Monday.
Israel says the encampment of corrugated shacks outside an Israeli settlement was illegally built and in an unsafe location near a major highway. It has offered to resettle residents a few miles away in what it says are improved conditions — with connections to water, electricity and sewage treatment they currently lack. But critics say it’s impossible for Palestinians to get building permits and the demolition plan is against the residents’ will and meant to make room for the expansion of an Israeli settlement.
Israel’s Supreme Court recently rejected a final appeal against the plan, paving the way for Khan Al-Ahmar’s potential demolition, should the government proceed with its plans.
The encampment has become a rallying cry for Palestinians and Israel has come under heavy criticism, with major European countries urging it to refrain from demolition and removal of Khan Al-Ahmar’s 180 or so residents.
Much of the high-level European engagement derives from concerns that such demolitions could threaten the prospect of a contiguous Palestinian state, at a time of already fading hopes for a two-state solution.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel is to arrive in Israel later this week for an unrelated visit, which may spark a further delay in Israeli action.
Some 200 activists were camped out at the location as the Oct. 1 deadline passed, giving the residents training for that they call non-violent resistance. “We trained them how to quickly move into the shacks, in groups, and make the soldiers’ mission as difficult as they can,” said Monzer Amereh, a leading activist who has been there for weeks. “We are going to sit inside the shacks and will not leave and let them take us out by force.”
Activists said Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’ Palestinian Authority has been supporting the community and providing them with legal and financial assistance. Residents have recently planted more trees and set up new shacks in a show of defiance.
“We will not leave, we will sit in the wild until they leave, and we will rebuild it again,” said Eid Khamis, the community’s leader. “This is our land, not their land and we live here and die here.”
Israel says the case is a simple matter of law and order. Officials note that Israel has also evicted Jewish settlers who have squatted illegally. But settlers generally have a much easier time receiving building permits, and the government often retroactively legalizes unauthorized outposts, looks the other way or offers compensation to uprooted settlers.
For the Palestinians, it is seen as part of a creeping annexation of territory they seek for a future state.
The village is in the 60 percent of the West Bank known as Area C, which remains under exclusive Israeli control and is home to dozens of Israeli settlements. Israel places severe restrictions on Palestinian development there and home demolitions are not unusual.
As part of interim peace deals in the 1990s, the West Bank was carved up into autonomous and semi-autonomous Palestinian areas, known as Areas A and B, and Area C, which is home to some 400,000 Israeli settlers.
The Palestinians claim all the West Bank for their future state and say that Area C, home also to an estimated 150,000 to 200,000 Palestinians, is crucial to its economic development.


Bahrain to join US-led efforts to protect Gulf navigation

Updated 12 min 15 sec ago

Bahrain to join US-led efforts to protect Gulf navigation

  • Bahrain’s King Hamad voiced his appreciation of the US role in supporting 'regional security and stability'
  • US is seeking coalition to guarantee freedom of navigation in the Gulf

DUBAI: Bahrain said Monday it would join US-led efforts to protect shipping in the Arabian Gulf amid tensions between Washington and Tehran after a series of attacks on tankers.
Bahrain’s King Hamad voiced his country’s appreciation of the “US role in supporting regional security and stability” during a meeting with US Central Command (CENTCOM) chief General Kenneth McKenzie, state media said.
“The king confirmed the kingdom of Bahrain’s participation in the joint effort to preserve the safety of international maritime navigation and secure international corridors for trade and energy,” the official Bahrain News Agency reported.
The US has been seeking to form a coalition to guarantee freedom of navigation in the Gulf.
Britain, which already has warships on protection duty in the Gulf after a UK-flagged tanker was seized by Iranian Revolutionary Guards, has said it will join the planned operation.
But other European countries have declined to join, for fear of harming European efforts to rescue a 2015 treaty with Iran over its nuclear program.
Bahrain, which hosts the US Fifth Fleet, said last month that it would co-host a conference with the US on “maritime and air navigation security,” set for October.
Iran has seized three tankers in strategic Gulf waters since last month, including a British-flagged vessel.
That came after British Royal Marines helped impound a tanker carrying Iranian oil off the British overseas territory of Gibraltar on July 4.
Britain suspected it was destined for Syria in defiance of European Union sanctions, which Iran denies.
The US and its Gulf allies have also accused the Islamic republic of carrying out several mysterious attacks on ships in the region, which Tehran denies.