‘Sui Dhaaga’ is a beautifully tailored look at entrepreneurial spirit 

A still from ‘Sui Dhaaga: Made in India.’ (
Updated 03 October 2018
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‘Sui Dhaaga’ is a beautifully tailored look at entrepreneurial spirit 

  • Sui Dhaaga: Made in India weaves into a middle-class community on the outskirts of Delhi where a family struggles to keep its head above water

CHENNAI: Director Sharat Khatariya’s passion seems to be dysfunctional families. While his 2015 film “Dum Laga Ke Haisha” was a hilarious take on how a plus-size woman struggles to find acceptance in her marriage and new home, his latest work, “Sui Dhaaga: Made in India,” weaves into a middle-class community on the outskirts of Delhi where a family struggles to keep its head above water. Much like Akshay Kumar’s “Pad Man,” “Sui Dhaaga” (Needle and Thread) is a compelling take on the Indian entrepreneurial dream. What is delightful about Khatariya’s movie is its focus on small-town India, where aspirations are growing, and along with it the resolve to be a master of one’s own destiny. This means goodbye to hire-and-fire jobs and hello to self-reliant start-ups.

Varun Dhawan’s Mauji may be a village bumpkin, often facing the butt of his employer’s insensitive jokes, but when they begin to hurt and humiliate him, he walks out of the shop where he worked for years. With a father (a delightfully sarcastic Raghuvir Yadav) on the verge of retiring from his nondescript assignment, an ailing mother (Yamini Dass) and a young, full-of-hopes wife, Mamta (Anoushka Sharma), to take care of, Mauji’s decision could have been nothing short of disaster. It is here that Mamta breaks out of her meek, demure shell to get her husband back on his feet and nudge him toward his talent. An excellent tailor, he literally stitches his way to stardom.

Despite the agonizing struggle of its lead characters (the scene in which Mauji is at a sewing competition, running the machine with a bleeding leg, is brilliant), “Sui Dhaaga” never slips into gloom and there is enough mirth and lightheartedness to push it through the tapestry of a small town, marvelously captured by cinematographer Anil Mehta. Both Sharma, simple and sweet sans any heavy makeup, and an understated Dhawan add sparkle to the narrative. But we know where the story line is headed, and this is where “Sui Dhaaga” fails to tailor the perfect cut.


Saudi treasures at Louvre Abu Dhabi dazzle visitors

The exhibition helps to spread cultural knowledge among visitors about the glorious past of the region. (Photos/SPA)
Updated 17 December 2018
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Saudi treasures at Louvre Abu Dhabi dazzle visitors

  • The event reflects image of distant past from the heart of a country that preserves the spirit of ancient civilization

JEDDAH: The Roads of Arabia exhibition at the Louvre Museum Abu Dhabi has proved a big attraction for visitors of various nationalities. Subtitled Archaeological Treasures of Saudi Arabia, it carries important information about the history and civilizations of the Kingdom and the Arabian Peninsula.
Visitors expressed their pride that the exhibition confirms the Kingdom’s special place in the field of archaeology, in both the discovery of these treasures and the way they are preserved.
“The exhibition represents the ancient desert memory when trade was the lifeblood of the world. The Arab trade route through the region was one of the world’s most famous routes at the time,” said former Director General of the French National Museums Pierre-Francois Zemmour.
A similar exhibition titled Treasures of Saudi Arabia was held in the Paris Louvre in 2010 and achieved great popularity in Europe, according to Zemmour.
“The exhibition hosted by Louvre Abu Dhabi this year displays 466 artifacts from the Arabian peninsula, the land of the Hijaz and the Arabian Kingdom of Kindah in 200BC,” he added.
“This is a cultural and historical event of great importance which is attracting the attention of thousands of people around the world. It shows the authentic lifestyle of these ancient peoples, who were interested in riding, breeding falcons and hunting, as well as in the protection and organization of commercial convoys,” Zemmour said.
“What is distinctive about the exhibition is that the museum reflects the image of the distant past from the heart of a country that still preserves the spirit of ancient civilization and lives on the spirit of authenticity in a contemporary form.”
Simone Garaudy, a researcher at the National Institute of Archaeology and Heritage in Paris, said that Western and Arab archaeological missions have discovered thousands of important sites in the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain over the past 10 years. “These discoveries are very important for the history of humanity. It is great to see that the UAE is particularly interested in national museums which represent the memory of the region and preserve the history of the Gulf region and the civilization of the Arabian Desert for the present and future generations,” said Garaudy.
Garaudy said that the Louvre Abu Dhabi displays the great value of the past using the latest techniques of presentation, preservation and storage. “This is very important because it makes it easy for millions of people around the world to follow the exhibitions, which present Arab history to the world,” she added.
Jean de Cornies, an artist and a member of the board of trustees of the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, said that the Louvre Abu Dhabi Museum has a collection of thousands of artifacts that reflect Arab lifestyle through the ages, collected from the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Yemen and Oman.
“The Department of Culture and Tourism Abu Dhabi works with its counterparts in other Arab countries and around the world, making the Louvre Abu Dhabi a integrated historical memory that reflects a long history of the Arabs.”
Indian researcher Alimuddin said: “I can see sculptures from the Stone Age and artifacts that are tens of thousands of years old, and this makes us rethink many ideas and wonder how these pieces have been preserved, despite the difficult environmental conditions in the region.”
Kabra, a visitor, stressed the importance of viewing this great heritage, noting that she did not know much about the heritage of the Arabian Peninsula, and that holding such exhibitions helps to spread cultural knowledge among the people.