Saudi Arabia to provide specialist centers to aid child custody laws

In this file photo, Saudi women and a child walk along a street in Riyadh. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 02 October 2018
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Saudi Arabia to provide specialist centers to aid child custody laws

  • The ministry signed agreements with two non-profit institutes to form an initiative called “Shaml”
  • The centers will offer services related to child custody laws as well as providing social and psychological support to parents and children

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Justice has ordered the provision of specialized centers to help implement child custody and visitation laws in Saudi Arabia.
Waleed Al-Samaani said the ministry signed agreements with two non-profit institutes to form an initiative called “Shaml” or unity to provide centers to implement custody laws.
The initiative aims to create a suitable environment for families without needing to enforce such laws in courts or duty stations. It comes as part of Saudi Arabia’s National Transformation plan 2020, to fulfill Vision 2030.
The centers will offer services related to child custody laws as well as providing social and psychological support to parents and children to reduce tension and protect child rights.


Saudi-based interfaith center calls for concerted efforts to check intolerance

Faisal bin Abdulrahman bin Muammar.(SPA)
Updated 4 min 15 sec ago
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Saudi-based interfaith center calls for concerted efforts to check intolerance

  • Faisal bin Abdulrahman bin Muammar said this phenomenon will only disappear through the concerted efforts of individuals and organizations to promote dialogue and tolerance

RIYADH: The world is headed for more extreme forms of terrorism, in the wake of the attacks against Muslim worshippers in New Zealand, and against Jews in Pittsburgh in the US, said the secretary-general of the King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz International Center for Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue (KAICIID).
This type of terrorism is supported by some elected figures from hard-line political parties who support and market extremism through their official channels, taking advantage of the freedoms that govern Western countries, said Faisal bin Abdulrahman bin Muammar.
KAICIID presents religion as part of the solution, not the source of the problem, he added. In the West, separation of religion and state, and rejection of religion as part of the solution, have “resulted in failed treatments no less dangerous than the failure of military attempts to combat terrorism,” he said.
“Throughout these attempts and initiatives, which have been accompanied by an escalation of media and political extremist campaigns against Islam and Muslims, as well as other religious and ethnic minorities, Western societies have witnessed growth in populist movements and a rise in the popularity of extreme right-wing parties, which found in the hatred of Islam, Muslims and immigrants fertile ground to gain popular support and realize political interests.”
What happened in New Zealand reflects the emergence of a wider phenomenon that KAICIID has long warned against, bin Muammar said.
He said this phenomenon will only disappear through the concerted efforts of individuals and organizations to promote dialogue and tolerance. In addition to that, he added, there is a need enact laws to criminalize actions against Muslims and followers of other religions similar to the laws formed to check anti-Semitism.