Paris Hilton eyes up an ‘epic trip’ to Dubai

The reality star has visited Dubai in the past. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 06 October 2018
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Paris Hilton eyes up an ‘epic trip’ to Dubai

DUBAI: Former reality TV star Paris Hilton showed her love for Dubai in an Instagram post and during a guest appearance on a UAE-based radio show this week.
The blonde beauty mogul, who founded the Paris Hilton Skincare line, posted a cheeky photo on Instagram in which she is staring lovingly at a muzzled camel.
“I love Dubai,” she captioned the image.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I love #Dubai

A post shared by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on

Earlier on Thursday, the star, who is famous for coining the catchphrase “that’s hot,” phoned into The Kris Fade radio show and talked about her love for the city, according to Emirates Woman magazine.
“I want to plan an epic trip to Dubai right now. I’m just looking at my calendar,” she said.
“I haven’t been there in so long. It’s so beautiful there and it’s so much fun. I want to go sky diving. I want to go (to) Dubai Mall, I want to go everywhere.”
Hilton visited the UAE in 2009 to film for her reality TV show “Paris Hilton’s Dubai BFF” and has returned multiple times since then — including a trip in 2014 when she was hired to perform a DJ set at the opening of a restaurant in the city.
She even shared a message with the crown prince of Dubai Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum on Instagram in late 2017.
“Fly safe,” she commented on a photograph uploaded by the hugely popular member of the royal family as he jetted off on his travels.
That same year, Hilton was tipped to launch her own luxury hotel chain in Dubai, New York and Las Vegas, following in the footsteps of her great-grandfather Conrad Hilton, the founder of Hilton Hotels.
Dubai has become known as a magnet for international celebrities — in the past week alone the likes of Rihanna, US rapper Kid Ink, Akon and Tinie Tempah have been spotted at events around the city.
If Hilton has it her way, she could be touching down in the so-called city of gold very soon.

 


‘Not your habibti’: Palestinian designer seeks to empower women

Updated 15 January 2019
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‘Not your habibti’: Palestinian designer seeks to empower women

  • Designer Yasmeen Mjalli sees the clothes as helping empower Palestinian women facing unwelcome male attention in public
  • Mjalli says that her fight against harassment of women is unconnected to the #MeToo movement

RAMALLAH, Palestinian Territories: It’s only three words on a T-shirt or embroidered on a denim jacket in Palestinian designer Yasmeen Mjalli’s collection, but they carry a powerful message: “Not your habibti,” or darling.
She sees the clothes as helping empower Palestinian women facing unwelcome male attention in public.
“When a woman is exposed to so much harassment on the street, she begins to dress to protect herself, to hide herself as opposed to expressing herself,” the 22-year-old art history graduate says, leaning against the counter of her shop in Ramallah in the occupied West Bank.
On fabrics of muted colors and on canvas bags from her BabyFist label, she places messages in English and Arabic inside drawings of flowers and other designs.
“Every rose has its revolution,” one says.
Mjalli grew up in the US, where she lived with her Palestinian parents.
She started painting slogans on her own clothes when the family relocated to the West Bank and she found herself facing a different reality.
“I have experienced things like comments, really uncomfortable stares, the kind that make you feel very violated,” she said.
“I have been assaulted in the streets, people touching me,” she adds, catching one tattooed arm in her other hand to mimic being grabbed.
In August 2017, she launched her first collection and a few months later opened the Ramallah shop to complement her existing online sales.
“It’s not like the T-shirt is going to stop harassment,” she says.
But it’s “a reminder that you are part of something bigger that is working to empower women and to give back in some way and that is trying to have this conversation that challenges all of these structures which we are victims of too,” she adds.
The goal, Mjalli says, is to create a community.
Using Instagram, free workshops in her shop and public places where she sometimes installs herself with a typewriter, she offers Palestinian women the freedom to express their feelings and tell stories they cannot share elsewhere.
She donates around 10 percent of her fashion earnings to a local women’s group.
One project she funds sent a doctor and volunteers into schools to teach Palestinian girls about menstruation, a subject still largely taboo.
While defining herself as a feminist, Mjalli says that her fight against harassment of women is unconnected to the #MeToo movement.
“I don’t think it’s related even though it happened at the same time,” she said, though acknowledging that the movement gave her own efforts a boost.
“It’s a very American and it’s a very white feminism, and it’s not what we are doing here.”
All BabyFist garments are made in the Palestinian territories.
Jackets are sewn in Hassan Shehada’s Gaza workshop.
Among the sewing machines humming under florescent lights, Shehada shows a denim jacket embroidered with “Not your habibti.”
“I am proud that women wear the fruits of my labors and I am also very proud that they are labeled ‘Made in Palestine’,” he says.
In the past three months, he has made 1,500 items for BabyFist.
It was a breath of fresh air for Shehada’s business in the Gaza Strip, under an Israeli blockade for more than a decade and with endemic high unemployment.
“Working with BabyFist has given me back hope,” he says, adding that it has fulfilled a dream of exporting to Europe.
But manufacturing in Gaza comes at a cost.
Israeli restrictions mean jackets have been held up for weeks when the land crossing through Israel was closed due to mass Palestinian protests and clashes along the fence, Mjalli said.
“The border was closed indefinitively and we couldn’t get anything in or out,” she said. “It’s a constant battle.”
She says that around 40 percent of her sales are made in the Ramallah store and 60 percent online, mostly to the Palestinian and broader Arab diaspora.
Not everyone, however, is a fan.
Mjalli has come under fire from conservatives, who say she draws attention to women’s bodies by designing clothes that carry provocative messages.
Her criticism of some aspects of Palestinian society has also raised the hackles of those who believe that the struggle against Israeli occupation is the only legitimate public campaign.
For her, the fight for Palestinian independence and campaigning for women’s rights are intertwined.
“The occupation robs men in our society of any sense of control, any sense of masculinity which in turn affects women’s rights,” she says.
For Mjalli, there have been “already two or three generations of women that have had to suffer while we say: ‘OK, you can wait.’”