The Six: Top looks from Dolce & Gabbana’s show in Dubai

A previous Dolce & Gabbana show in Milan. (AFP)
Updated 08 October 2018
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The Six: Top looks from Dolce & Gabbana’s show in Dubai

  • Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana left onlookers awestruck with their first-ever show in the Middle East

DUBAI: Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana left onlookers awestruck with their first-ever show in the Middle East on Sunday night. Here are six looks from the event, which was held at The Dubai Mall.

Embellished abaya
An intricate and beautifully embroidered abaya, the gold embellishments and sequins make this a one of a kind look.

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Look n.1 #DGLovesDubai

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Patterns on patterns
A dress with a shape to flatter any body type — flowy and cinched at the waist — the patterned patchwork makes this outfit stand out.

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Look n.5 #DGLovesDubai

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Regal suit
Not your typical suit, this black number is printed with regal motifs and crown appliques. The cut is casual, but the print makes quite a statement.

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Look n.32 #DGLovesDubai

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Simply red
A full red look is always eye-catching and flatters just about anyone. This flowy dress, with intricate white detailing and feathered shoulders, has a very flamboyant feel.

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Look n.17 #DGLovesDubai

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Polka dots and patterns
A dress with polka dots and colorful fabric could overpower the wearer, but if you can pull it off you will turn heads for the best of reasons.

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Look n.35 #DGLovesDubai

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Flower power
This feminine, A-line dress recalls 1950’s fashion trends due to its tea-length hemline. The petal appliques are the perfect embellishments and add just the right amount of flair to make the dress stand out and modernize the cut.

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Look n.127 #DGLovesDubai

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‘I’m as Palestinian as I am Dutch,’ Gigi Hadid says

Updated 18 November 2018
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‘I’m as Palestinian as I am Dutch,’ Gigi Hadid says

DUBAI: Model-of-the-moment Gigi Hadid took to the stage at an event in Sydney last week to defend her heritage and express her “respect” for her Arab roots.
The 23-year-old model, whose father is Palestinian and mother is Dutch, made the fiery statement during a promotional appearance for Reebok’s “Be More Human” campaign.
“When I shot the cover of Vogue Arabia, I wasn’t ‘Arab enough’ to be representing those girls, even though I’m half-Palestinian,” Hadid told the crowd of her March 2017 cover for the magazine, according to Yahoo. “I’m as Palestinian as I am Dutch. Just because I have blonde hair, I still carry the value of my ancestors and I appreciate and respect that.”

The model also touched on her much-reported-on relationship with British singer Zayn Malik, saying the pair had discussed her background in the past.
“I was taking about this to my boyfriend too, he is half-Pakistani and half-English,” she said, according to the Daily Mail. “And there’s always this thing where you’re mixed race or you come from two different worlds. You see how both sides treat each other. And you become a bridge between both sides.”
Gigi isn’t the only Hadid sibling to talk publicly about the family’s roots.
In April 2017, her sister Bella opened up about their Palestinian father’s immigration experience and her embrace of Islam in an interview with Porter magazine.
The siblings’ father, Mohamed Hadid, lived in Syria and Lebanon before he moved to the US in his teens.
“My dad was a refugee when he first came to America,” Bella said in the interview.
“He was always religious and he always prayed with us. I am proud to be a Muslim,” she added.
In her latest appearance in Sydney, older sister Gigi also touched on the pressures of the competitive fashion industry.
“Regardless of who you are, or what you do, you always are allowed to give yourself room to screw up and learn and grow,” she said. “I’m a human and someone that can make mistakes,” she said. “But I can still learn and grow and be better.”