‘Bad Blood’: Trump sours on Taylor Swift after Dem endorsement

Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., speaks as President Donald Trump listens at a rally Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, in Johnson City, Tenn. (AP)
Updated 09 October 2018
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‘Bad Blood’: Trump sours on Taylor Swift after Dem endorsement

  • The president was asked for his reaction to the snub and told reporters at the White House he was “sure Taylor Swift doesn’t know anything” about Blackburn

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump said Monday he liked pop superstar Taylor Swift’s music “about 25 percent less” after her endorsement of the Democrat in Tennessee’s Senate race.
The “Bad Blood” singer backed Phil Bredesen on Sunday for the upper house in her home state, and unleashed a fierce attack on his opponent, Republican Marsha Blackburn, who currently serves in the House.
The president was asked for his reaction to the snub and told reporters at the White House he was “sure Taylor Swift doesn’t know anything” about Blackburn.
“Let’s say that I like Taylor’s music about 25 percent less now, okay?” Trump added, flashing what could best be described as a cheeky grin.
Trump, it should be noted, has form going back years as something of a Swifty.
“Glad to hear that @taylorswift13 will be co-hosting the Grammy nominations special on 12.5. Taylor is terrific!” he tweeted breathlessly in October 2012.
In August of that year, addressing her directly, he swooned: “Thanks for the beautiful picture--- you are fantastic!“
The singer tends to stay above the political fray, but told her 112 million Instagram followers on Sunday she felt she needed to speak out ahead of the midterm elections in November.
“As much as I have in the past and would like to continue voting for women in office, I cannot support Marsha Blackburn. Her voting record in Congress appalls and terrifies me,” the 28-year-old said.
“She voted against equal pay for women. She voted against the Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which attempts to protect women from domestic violence, stalking, and date rape.”
Last year, Swift won a lawsuit against a former radio DJ she accused of groping her.


Japan’s ‘Uncle Olympics’ fan dies just short of 2020 Games

Naotoshi Yamada, above, was planning to attend the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo in 2020. (Reuters/File)
Updated 18 March 2019
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Japan’s ‘Uncle Olympics’ fan dies just short of 2020 Games

  • The man attended all summer games since 1964
  • He often wore a golden hat when he attended the games

TOKYO: A Japanese Olympic mega-fan who attended every summer games since Tokyo in 1964 has died, just over a year before his home city was to host its second Olympics.
Tokyo businessman Naotoshi Yamada, 92, who died on March 9 from heart failure, was a national celebrity in his own right with his repeated, gleeful appearances in Olympic stands.
“Uncle Olympics,” as he came to be known, was an omnipresent fixture for Japanese TV watchers cheering on the Japan team at the “Greatest Show On Earth.”
Often sporting a gold top hat, kimono, and a beaming smile, Yamada also became a darling of the international media.
“After 92 years of his life spent cheering, Naotoshi Yamada, international Olympic cheerleader, was called to eternal rest on March 9, 2019,” said his web site, managed by a firm he founded.
Born in 1926, Yamada built a successful wire rope manufacturing business, and also expanded his portfolio to include the hotel and real estate sectors.
But away from work, his passion was for sport, particularly the Olympics.
He did not miss a summer games since 1964, taking in Mexico City, Munich, Montreal, Moscow, Los Angeles, Seoul, Barcelona, Atlanta, Sydney, Athens, Beijing, London and Rio de Janeiro.
For good measure, he also attended the winter games when it rolled into Nagano in 1998, and told local media of his strong desire to attend the 2020 Tokyo Games.
Yamada saw the first Tokyo Olympics when he was 38.
But his passion was truly ignited during the 1968 Mexico City Games, according to his website.
He donned a kimono and a sombrero hat and loudly cheered for a Mexican 5000-meter runner, mistaking him for a Japanese athlete.
Local spectators embraced the scene and loudly cheered for Japanese athletes in return, leading to an electrifying show of support that went beyond nationality, his website said.
“He saw the awesome power of cheering, and was mesmerised by it ever since,” it said.