Kanye West to visit Trump, discuss prison reform, violence

In this Dec. 13, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump and Kanye West pose for a picture in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. Kanye West will visit the White House on Thursday to meet with President Donald Trump and his son-in-law Jared Kushner talk about manufacturing in America, gang violence, prison reform and Chicago violence. (AP)
Updated 09 October 2018
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Kanye West to visit Trump, discuss prison reform, violence

  • West is scheduled to have lunch with President Donald Trump and meet with Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, on Thursday
  • Trump recently tweeted praise for West, who closed a “Saturday Night Live” show wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat

WASHINGTON: Rapper Kanye West has been invited to the White House.
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders says West is scheduled to have lunch with President Donald Trump and meet with Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, on Thursday. Sanders says they’ll talk about manufacturing, prison reform, preventing gang violence and reducing violence in Chicago, where West grew up.
Trump recently tweeted praise for West, who closed a “Saturday Night Live” show wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat and delivering an unscripted pro-Trump message after the credits rolled.
West is married to reality television star Kim Kardashian West, who successfully pushed Trump to grant a pardon for a drug offender this year and has met with senior aides regarding criminal justice reform.


What We Are Reading Today: Rights as Weapons by Clifford Bob

Updated 26 March 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Rights as Weapons by Clifford Bob

  • Rights as Weapons focuses on the underexamined ways in which the powerful wield rights as aggressive weapons against the weak

Rights are usually viewed as defensive concepts representing mankind’s highest aspirations to protect the vulnerable and uplift the downtrodden. But since the Enlightenment, political combatants have also used rights belligerently, to batter despised communities, demolish existing institutions, and smash opposing ideas. Delving into a range of historical and contemporary conflicts from all areas of the globe, Rights as Weapons focuses on the underexamined ways in which the powerful wield rights as aggressive weapons against the weak.

Clifford Bob looks at how political forces use rights as rallying cries: Naturalizing novel claims as rights inherent in humanity, absolutizing them as trumps over rival interests or community concerns, universalizing them as transcultural and transhistorical, and depoliticizing them as concepts beyond debate. He shows how powerful proponents employ rights as camouflage to cover ulterior motives, as crowbars to break rival coalitions, among other issues. 

As blockades to suppress subordinate groups, as spears to puncture discrete policies, and as dynamite to explode whole societies. And he demonstrates how the targets of rights campaigns repulse such assaults, using their own rights-like weapons: Denying the abuses they are accused of, constructing rival rights to protect themselves, portraying themselves as victims rather than violators, and repudiating authoritative decisions against them.