YouTube driving global consumption of music

IFPI published on Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming. (File photo: Reuters)
Updated 09 October 2018
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YouTube driving global consumption of music

  • IFPI published on Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming
  • Nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube

LONDON: If you are listening to music, chances are you’re on YouTube.
A music consumer report by the industry’s global body IFPI published on Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming.
And nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube.
Video as a whole accounted for 52 percent of the time we spent streaming music, posing challenges to such subscription services as Spotify and SoundCloud.
But while Spotify’s estimated annual revenue per user was $20 (17.5 euros), YouTube’s was less than a dollar.
The London-based IFPI issued a broader overview in April that found digital sales for the first time making up the majority of global revenues thanks to streaming.
The report published on Tuesday looked into where and when we listen to music.
It found that three in four people globally use smartphones, with the rate among 16 to 24 year olds reaching 94 percent.
The highest levels were recorded in India, where 96 percent of consumers used smartphones for music, including 99 percent of young adults.
But music does not end when we put away our phones, with 86 percent globally also listening to radio.
Copyright infringement was still a big issue, with unlicensed music accounting for 38 percent of what was consumed around the world.
“This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face — both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said IFPI chief Frances Moore.
The report noted that “96% of consumers in China and 96% in India listen to licensed music.”
It did not, however, say how many of those consumers also listened to music that infringed copyrights.
Overall, the average consumer spent 2.5 hours a day listening to music, with the largest share of it consumed while driving, the industry report said.


Google fined $1.7bn for search ad blocks

Updated 20 March 2019
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Google fined $1.7bn for search ad blocks

  • Google received three fines in the past two years
  • EU Commission says Google has been blocking competitors for the past ten years

BRUSSELS: Google was fined $1.7 billion on Wednesday for blocking rival online search advertisers, the third large European Union antitrust penalty for the Alphabet business in two only years.

The European Commission, which said the fine accounted for 1.29 percent of Google’s turnover in 2018, said in a statement that the anti-competitive practices had lasted a decade.

“Google has cemented its dominance in online search adverts and shielded itself from competitive pressure by imposing anti-competitive contractual restrictions on third-party websites,” European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said.

The case concerned websites, such as of newspaper or travel sites, with a search function that produces search results and search adverts. Google’s AdSense for Search provided such search adverts.

The misconduct included stopping publishers from placing any search adverts from competitors on their search results pages, forcing them to reserve the most profitable space on their search results pages for Google’s adverts and a requirement to seek written approval from Google before making changes to the way in which any rival adverts were displayed.

The AdSense advertising case was triggered by a complaint from Microsoft in 2010. Both companies subsequently dropped complaints against each other in 2016.

Last year, Vestager imposed a record $4.92 billion fine on Google for using its popular Android mobile operating system to block rivals. This followed a $2.74 billion fine in June 2017 for hindering rivals of shopping comparison websites.

Google is now trying to comply with the order to ensure a level playing field with proposals to boost price comparison rivals and prompt Android users to choose their preferred browsers and search apps. Critics however are still not happy.