More talks needed to reopen Syria trade route, says Amman

A man rides on a motorbike at the Syrian-Jordanian border at the Nassib crossing in Syria's Deraa province. (File/ Reuters)
Updated 11 October 2018
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More talks needed to reopen Syria trade route, says Amman

  • The closure of the Nassib crossing in 2015 cut a crucial transit route for hundreds of trucks a day transporting goods between Turkey and the Gulf, and Lebanon and the Gulf
  • Damascus, which retook the crossing from the opposition last July, hopes to reopen the Nassib route

AMMAN: Jordan said on Tuesday more talks with Syria were needed before an important border crossing shut for three years as a result of its neighbor’s war could reopen to serve regional trade.

The closure of the Nassib crossing in 2015 cut a crucial transit route for hundreds of trucks a day transporting goods between Turkey and the Gulf, and Lebanon and the Gulf, in multibillion-dollar annual trade.

Damascus, which retook the crossing from the opposition last July, hopes to reopen the Nassib route because it is vital to its hopes of reviving Syria’s shattered economy and rebuilding in territory under its control.

But Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi said technical committees between the two countries which began talks in the middle of September were still working out the practical arrangements.

“The border will open after the technical committees end all the necessary arrangements and measures needed to guarantee opening the borders serves the common interests of the two countries,” Safadi said after talks with his Lebanese counterpart.

Jordan has denied it agreed on a date to reopen the crossing after Damascus announced on Sept. 29 that movement of traffic and goods had begun. Syria retracted that announcement later that day, saying it would reopen on Oct. 10.

Diplomats and officials have privately said the move appeared to signal mounting pressure by Damascus on Amman to speed up the opening of the crossing. Earlier, the Syrian regime had said they had rehabilitated the crossing and it was ready to receive Syrian refugees.

Lebanon’s Foreign Minister Gebran Bassil in his visit to Amman lobbied Safadi for a speedy reopening, saying it would be a step toward stability in the war-torn country.

“There is big hope that Nassib opens soon so that traffic goes back to its former strength,” Bassil told reporters.

Lebanon’s economy minister told Reuters in July the crossing was “a vital artery” for the Lebanese economy where it is a conduit for millions of dollars of exports of fresh produce to lucrative Gulf markets. 


Thousands protest against Algeria’s ruling elite

Updated 11 min 29 sec ago
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Thousands protest against Algeria’s ruling elite

  • President Abdelaziz Bouteflika stepped down after 20 years in power this month
  • “The system must go” and “We are fed up with you,” read banners held up by protesters in central Algiers

ALGIERS: Thousands of protesters demanding the departure of Algeria’s ruling elite rallied in Algiers for a tenth Friday.
President Abdelaziz Bouteflika stepped down after 20 years in power this month, bowing to pressure from the army and weeks of demonstrations mainly by young people seeking change.
“The system must go” and “We are fed up with you,” read banners held up by protesters in central Algiers.
The protests, which began on Feb. 22 and have been largely peaceful, have continued as many want the removal of an elite that has governed Algeria since independence from France in 1962 and the prosecution of people they see as corrupt.
Bouteflika has been replaced by Abdelkader Bensalah, head of the upper house of parliament, as interim president for 90 days until a presidential election on July 4.
Algeria’s wealthiest businessman and four other billionaires close to Bouteflika were arrested this week as part of an anti-graft investigation, state media said.
Algeria’s army chief Lt. General Ahmed Gaed Salah has said he expected members of the ruling elite to be prosecuted for corruption.
Salah intervened when Bouteflika sought to extend his fourth term, declaring him unfit for office in a bid to avoid prolonged turmoil.