Africa’s youngest billionaire Mohammed Dewji kidnapped in Tanzania

A file picture taken on April 23, 2015, shows Tanzanian businessman Mohammed Dewji at his office in Dar es Salaam. (AFP)
Updated 11 October 2018
0

Africa’s youngest billionaire Mohammed Dewji kidnapped in Tanzania

NAIROBI: Africa’s youngest billionaire was kidnapped Thursday by gunmen in Tanzania’s economic capital Dar es Salaam, officials said.
Mohammed Dewji, 43, who heads the MeTL Group which operates in about 10 countries with interests in agriculture to insurance, transport, logistics and the food industry, was snatched as he entered the gym of a hotel in the city.
“Initial information indicates he was kidnapped by whites traveling in two vehicles,” regional governor Paul Makonda told journalists, adding that “this kind of incident is new here.”
Dar es Salaam police chief Lazaro Mambosasa also implicated foreigners in the crime, telling a press conference the assailants had “shot into the air” before bustling Dewji into their car.
He said police were hunting for suspects and had already made arrests.
Dewji was born in Tanzania and studied at Georgetown University in the United States. He also served as a member of parliament from 2005 to 2015.
In 2013 he became the first Tanzanian to grace the cover of Forbes magazine, and was in 2015 named Forbes Africa Person of the Year.
Dewji is also the main shareholder in Tanzania’s Simba FC football club.
According to Forbes he is 17th on the list of Africa’s billionaires, and worth $1.5 billion (1.29 billion euros).
Dewji is married with three children. In 2016 he signed a pledge to donate at least half of his fortune to philanthropic causes, according to Forbes.


Europe, Japan send spacecraft on 7-year journey to Mercury

Updated 20 October 2018
0

Europe, Japan send spacecraft on 7-year journey to Mercury

  • Once the spacecraft arrives in late 2025, it will release two probes that will independently investigate the planet

TOKYO: European and Japanese space agencies say an Ariane 5 rocket has successfully lifted a spacecraft into orbit for a joint mission to Mercury, the closest planet to the sun.
The European Space Agency and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency say the BepiColombo spacecraft successfully separated and was sent into orbit from French Guiana early Saturday to begin a seven-year journey to Mercury.
The mission is complicated by the intense gravity pull of the sun, forcing the spacecraft to take an elliptical path that involves two fly-bys of Venus and six of Mercury itself.
Once the spacecraft arrives in late 2025, it will release two probes that will independently investigate the surface and magnetic field of Mercury.