New Zealand activists raise funds for Palestine charity after fine by Israel

In this Nov. 18, 2014, file photo, singer Lorde poses for photographers during an promotional event in Hong Kong. (AP)
Updated 14 October 2018
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New Zealand activists raise funds for Palestine charity after fine by Israel

  • Justine Sachs and Nadia Abu-Shanab said called the court’s ruling a “stunt” intended to intimidate Israel’s critics

MELBOURNE: Two New Zealand pro-Palestinian activists have raised NZ$14,000 ($9,108.40) as of Sunday for charity after being fined by an Israeli court for their alleged role in persuading pop star Lorde to cancel a concert in Tel Aviv last year.
Justine Sachs and Nadia Abu-Shanab said last week they would not pay the fine of 45,000 shekels ($12,423.05) awarded to three Israeli teenagers, calling the court’s ruling a “stunt” intended to intimidate Israel’s critics.
Instead, they asked people to donate money through website “givealittle.co.nz” to the Gaza Mental Health Foundation, a volunteer group that raises funds for mental health and women’s empowerment groups in the Gaza Strip.
As of Sunday, they raised NZ$14,000, according to the website.
“Given that we’ve actually had this kind of push upon us – we felt that it was expedient to actually recenter the issue back on Palestine,” Abu-Shanab told Radio New Zealand.
The case arose from an open letter that Sachs and Abu-Shanab wrote to Lorde, a New Zealander, on the website “thespinoff.co.nz” in December urging her to call off her planned concert.
Lorde canceled her concert in Israel that same month after a campaign by the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) group, which campaigns for Palestinian rights, that included the open letter published by Sachs and Abu-Shanab.

 


What China served at lunch in honor of the Saudi Crown Prince

Updated 22 February 2019
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What China served at lunch in honor of the Saudi Crown Prince

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince’s was served a lavish lunch in his honor on Friday during his China visit, which included a prized ingredient.

The crown prince dined on a chicken soup that included Matsutake, a highly sought after mushroom prized in Chinese cuisine for its distinct spicy-aromatic flavor. The price for matsutake can cost up to $1,000 per kilogram.

The menu also included a dish that consisted of seafood with onions, the main was mutton with a side of mushrooms and vegetables, as well as grilled salted-fish. A fruited platter was served for dessert with sweet light bites.

The lunch was held at Great Hall of the People and was attended by ministers, royal court officials and accompanying media delegates.