Seven killed in Morocco train derailment

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Security personnel stand at the site of a train derailment at Sidi Bouknadel near the Moroccan capital Rabat. (Reuters)
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Updated 16 October 2018
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Seven killed in Morocco train derailment

  • The train derailed near Sidi Bouknadel, a town near Rabat

SIDI BOUKNADEL, Morocco: At least seven people were killed and about 80 injured when a train was derailed near the Moroccan capital Rabat on Tuesday morning.
At least one wagon overturned in the incident near Sidi Bouknadel, a town 10 km north of Rabat, on a coastal line connecting the city of Kenitra to the commercial hub of Casablanca.
"I heard the very loud sound of the accident and rushed to the site, where I saw people screaming in fear and pain, while others were jumping out of the train windows," a witness told Reuters.
Many of the injured were taken to the Moulay Abdellah hospital in Sale, near Rabat.
"Some people lost their arms and legs in the accident," the medical source there said. Relatives of the victims wept at the hospital.
Some cases were treated at the Mohammed V military hospital in Rabat, state news agency MAP reported.
National railway operator ONCF said investigations into the cause of the crash were under way.
The royal court said King Mohammed VI would pay the funeral and burial expenses of the deceased.

The cause of the crash was still unknown. (Reuters)

 


Egypt celebrates antiquities museum before new institution takes the limelight

Updated 28 min 55 sec ago
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Egypt celebrates antiquities museum before new institution takes the limelight

CAIRO: Bright lights illuminated the Egyptian Museum in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Monday during a celebration that could mark the last time the two-story museum is feted as one of Egypt’s main tourist attractions.
Located in one of Egypt’s most famous squares, the museum has been the country’s principal keeper of antiquities for over a century, but a bigger museum is under construction.
Officials celebrated the 116th anniversary of its founding and insisted it will not become obsolete once the Grand Egyptian Museum opens its doors. Antiquities will be moved to the new museum, which is expected to partially open next year.
“Our ceremony this evening is to tell the world this museum will never die,” said Antiquities Minister Khaled Al-Anany.
The old museum will be used to display recent discoveries as well as antiquities from store rooms, the minister said.
Housing the world’s biggest collection of pharaonic antiquities has been a challenge for the museum building, which was established in 1902.
Tens of thousands of objects have been sitting in its storerooms and galleries were often said to be too packed.
The Grand Egyptian Museum will be located near the Pyramids and Cairo hopes it will help a tourism industry that has suffered from the turmoil that followed a 2011 uprising.
Highlights of the evening were exhibitions of mummies and the ornamented coffin covers of pharaonic courtier Yuya and his noblewoman wife Thuya.
A 20-meter-long papyrus said to be the longest on display in Egypt was also on show during the ceremony.