‘Money Heist’ makers give sneak peak of new thriller

Actress Irene Arcos (L), Spanish actor Alvaro Morte (C) and Spanish actress Veronica Sanchez (R) pose during a photocall for "The pier" TV series as part of the Mipcom, on October 16, 2018 in Cannes, southeastern France. (AFP)
Updated 17 October 2018
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‘Money Heist’ makers give sneak peak of new thriller

CANNES: The makers of “Money Heist,” the most-watched non-English language series in Netflix history, premiered their new show “The Pier” Tuesday, a romantic thriller also set in Spain.
Its creators Alex Pina and Esther Martinez Lobato told reporters that the new series was equally gripping — but in a “much more emotional way” — as they gave a sneak preview of the first episode at MIPCOM, the world’s top entertainment market in Cannes.
But while “Money Heist” (called “La Casa de Papel” in Spanish) takes place over 11 nail-biting days inside the Spanish Royal Mint as a crack team of crooks try to pull off the biggest robbery in history, “The Pier” is mostly shot outside in one of Spain’s most beautiful national parks.
 


What We Are Reading Today: Chaucer: A European Life by Marion Turner

Updated 20 March 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Chaucer: A European Life by Marion Turner

  • Marion Turner reconstructs in unprecedented detail the cosmopolitan world of Chaucer’s adventurous life

More than any other canonical English writer, Geoffrey Chaucer lived and worked at the center of political life—yet his poems are anything but conventional. Edgy, complicated, and often dark, they reflect a conflicted world, and their astonishing diversity and innovative language earned Chaucer renown as the father of English literature. Marion Turner, however, reveals him as a great European writer and thinker. To understand his accomplishment, she reconstructs in unprecedented detail the cosmopolitan world of Chaucer’s adventurous life, focusing on the places and spaces that fired his imagination, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website. 

Uncovering important new information about Chaucer’s travels, private life, and the early circulation of his writings, this innovative biography documents a series of vivid episodes, moving from the commercial wharves of London to the frescoed chapels of Florence and the kingdom of Navarre, where Christians, Muslims, and Jews lived side by side. The narrative recounts Chaucer’s experiences as a prisoner of war in France, as a father visiting his daughter’s nunnery, as a member of a chaotic Parliament, and as a diplomat in Milan, where he encountered the writings of Dante and Boccaccio. The book also offers a comprehensive exploration of Chaucer’s writings.