Aramco boosts oil export capacity from the west

Saudi Aramco has boosted oil export capacity in Yanbu. (Reuters)
Updated 17 October 2018
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Aramco boosts oil export capacity from the west

  • Move will allow Yanbu to handle extra 3 million barrels daily
  • Exports crude from oilfields in the east of the Kingdom

LONDON: Saudi Aramco has completed a major upgrade of its port at Yanbu that will allow it to handle an extra 3 million barrels per day of crude oil.
It comes amid a global supply crunch that has led to calls for increased output from Middle East oil exporters such as Saudi Arabia.
The terminal, which is located south of Yanbu on the west coast, consists of a tank farm and offshore facilities to receive, store and load Arabian Light and Arabian Super Light Crude.
“The successful startup of the Yanbu South Terminal is another milestone in reinforcing Saudi Aramco’s goal to be the world’s leading integrated energy and chemicals producer,” said Abdullah Al-Mansour, executive head of pipelines, distribution and terminals at Saudi Aramco.
Yanbu is one of Saudi Arabia’s key petroleum shipping terminals and the country’s second port after Jeddah, located about 300 kilometers to the south. Crude flows from oilfields in the east of the country through pipelines that terminate in Yanbu, before being loaded onto supertankers and being transported around the world.
OPEC Secretary-General Mohammad Barkindo on Tuesday urged oil companies to increase capacity and boost investment as spare oil capacity shrinks worldwide.
The global oil sector needs about $11 trillion in investment to meet future oil needs in the period up to 2040, Barkindo said.
Earlier this week Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said that the Kingdom was the world’s energy “shock absorber” and pledged to continue to offer a cushion to global supply interruptions.
His remarks coincided with mounting concerns among energy-importing nations about the recent rise in the oil price and increased pressure from the US for the Kingdom to boost production.
“We could have another unanticipated, unplanned disruption. We’ve seen Libya, we’ve seen Nigeria, we’ve seen Venezuela and we have sanctions on Iran. These supply disruptions need a shock absorber,” Al-Falih told the CERAWeek event by IHS Markit.
“The shock absorber has been, to a large part, Saudi Arabia. We have invested tens of billions of dollars to build the spare capacity which has been two to three million barrels over the years.”


Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank picks Barclays to advise on merger

Updated 45 min 1 sec ago
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Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank picks Barclays to advise on merger

  • Potential merger involves ADCB, Union National Bank (UNB) and Al Hilal Bank
  • A merger of the trio could create an entity with around $113 billion in assets

ABU DHABI: Barclays has been appointed by Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank (ADCB) to advise on a potential merger plan involving Union National Bank (UNB) and Al Hilal Bank, banking sources told Reuters.
The merger, announced by the banks in September, is the latest consolidation among state-owned companies in the United Arab Emirates’ (UAE) capital.
ADCB, majority owned by the Abu Dhabi government and the second largest bank in the emirate after First Abu Dhabi Bank (FAB), declined to comment. Barclays also declined to comment.
If it goes ahead, a merger of the trio could create an entity with around $113 billion in assets, according to Refinitiv data, and the UAE’s third-biggest lender after FAB and Emirates NBD.
A separate source said two banks could be created out of the consolidation, with the conventional banking units of ADCB and UNB merging to create one lender.
Another could be formed through combining the Islamic banking units of ADCB and UNB, along with Al Hilal.
AlKhaleej newspaper reported the same arrangement was being considered last month, citing sources.
The tie-up was at an early stage, UAE Central Bank governor Mubarak Rashed Al-Mansoori told reporters last week on the sidelines of a conference, adding he expected more consolidation in the future.
FAB was created by last year’s merger between National Bank of Abu Dhabi and First Gulf Bank.
The emirate of Sharjah is weighing a merger between three of its banks — Bank of Sharjah, Invest Bank and United Arab Bank, Reuters reported in September, citing sources.