Aramco boosts oil export capacity from the west

Saudi Aramco has boosted oil export capacity in Yanbu. (Reuters)
Updated 17 October 2018
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Aramco boosts oil export capacity from the west

  • Move will allow Yanbu to handle extra 3 million barrels daily
  • Exports crude from oilfields in the east of the Kingdom

LONDON: Saudi Aramco has completed a major upgrade of its port at Yanbu that will allow it to handle an extra 3 million barrels per day of crude oil.
It comes amid a global supply crunch that has led to calls for increased output from Middle East oil exporters such as Saudi Arabia.
The terminal, which is located south of Yanbu on the west coast, consists of a tank farm and offshore facilities to receive, store and load Arabian Light and Arabian Super Light Crude.
“The successful startup of the Yanbu South Terminal is another milestone in reinforcing Saudi Aramco’s goal to be the world’s leading integrated energy and chemicals producer,” said Abdullah Al-Mansour, executive head of pipelines, distribution and terminals at Saudi Aramco.
Yanbu is one of Saudi Arabia’s key petroleum shipping terminals and the country’s second port after Jeddah, located about 300 kilometers to the south. Crude flows from oilfields in the east of the country through pipelines that terminate in Yanbu, before being loaded onto supertankers and being transported around the world.
OPEC Secretary-General Mohammad Barkindo on Tuesday urged oil companies to increase capacity and boost investment as spare oil capacity shrinks worldwide.
The global oil sector needs about $11 trillion in investment to meet future oil needs in the period up to 2040, Barkindo said.
Earlier this week Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said that the Kingdom was the world’s energy “shock absorber” and pledged to continue to offer a cushion to global supply interruptions.
His remarks coincided with mounting concerns among energy-importing nations about the recent rise in the oil price and increased pressure from the US for the Kingdom to boost production.
“We could have another unanticipated, unplanned disruption. We’ve seen Libya, we’ve seen Nigeria, we’ve seen Venezuela and we have sanctions on Iran. These supply disruptions need a shock absorber,” Al-Falih told the CERAWeek event by IHS Markit.
“The shock absorber has been, to a large part, Saudi Arabia. We have invested tens of billions of dollars to build the spare capacity which has been two to three million barrels over the years.”


Japan prosecutors weigh bringing case against Nissan after Ghosn arrest -Asahi

Updated 20 min 4 sec ago
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Japan prosecutors weigh bringing case against Nissan after Ghosn arrest -Asahi

TOKYO: Japanese prosecutors are considering bringing a case against Nissan Motor Co. after Chairman Carlos Ghosn’s arrest on suspicion of financial misconduct, the Asahi Shimbun daily said on Wednesday.
Ghosn, one of the global car industry’s best-known leaders, was arrested on Monday after Nissan’s internal investigations found he had allegedly engaged in years of wrongdoing, including personal use of company money and under-reporting earnings. The Japanese company plans to remove him as chairman on Thursday.
Prosecutors said Ghosn and Representative Director Greg Kelly conspired to understate Ghosn’s compensation over five years starting in fiscal 2010 as being about half of the actual 10 billion yen ($88.65 million).
The Asahi quoted unnamed sources as saying that the mis-stating meant the company also bore responsibility and that prosecutors were eyeing the possibility of putting together a case against it.
Prosecutors were not immediately able to comment. Nissan declined to comment on the report.
There has been no comment from Ghosn or Kelly on any of the allegations against them, including a report in Japan’s Nikkei business daily on Tuesday that Ghosn had received share price-linked compensation of about 4 billion yen over a five-year period to March 2015 but that it went unreported in Nissan’s financial reports.
Reuters could not contact Ghosn or Kelly for comment.
Ghosn is also chairman and chief executive of Nissan’s French partner Renault, and chairman of Japan’s Mitsubishi Motors Corp, the third partner in the alliance.
Renault on Tuesday tapped its chief operating officer and a senior board member to fill in for Ghosn, but the board refrained from firing him while awaiting for detail on the allegations — a decision that could buy more time for an accelerated, permanent succession process.
Shares in Nissan rose 0.6 percent on Wednesday after falling nearly 6 percent a day earlier. ($1 = 112.8000 yen)