Middle East ride-hailing app Careem secures $200 million new funding

Careem says it has 30 million registered users in over 120 cities in the Middle East, North Africa, Turkey and Pakistan. (Reuters)
Updated 18 October 2018
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Middle East ride-hailing app Careem secures $200 million new funding

  • Careem has expanded into new markets this year such as Sudan and has been trialing food delivery services since February
  • Careem, founded in 2012, says it has 30 million registered users in over 120 cities

DUBAI: Middle East ride-hailing company Careem said on Thursday it had secured $200 million in new funding from existing investors, including from Saudi Arabian billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal’s Kingdom Holding.
Dubai-headquartered Careem, the main regional rival of Uber Technologies, has expanded into new markets this year such as Sudan and has been trialing food delivery services since February.
The $200 million was the first close of a funding round in which it expects to raise over $500 million, Careem said in a statement.
The $200 million raised from existing investors also includes Saudi Arabia’s Al Tayyar Group and STV, and Japanese e-commerce company Rakuten, Careem said.
It was not immediately clear what Careem’s valuation would be after securing the latest funding. It was estimated to be worth about $1 billion as of December 2016.
Reuters reported in March Careem was in early talks to raise as much as $500 million from investors.
Careem, founded in 2012, says it has 30 million registered users in over 120 cities in the Middle East, North Africa, Turkey and Pakistan.
Careem has previously raised funding from German car maker Daimler and China’s largest ride-hailing company DiDi Chuxing, among others.


BMW plans massive cost cuts to keep profits from sputtering

Updated 20 March 2019
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BMW plans massive cost cuts to keep profits from sputtering

  • ‘Our business model must remain a profitable one in the digital era,’ chief executive Harald Krueger said
  • Total number of employees is set to remain flat at around 135,000 worldwide

MUNICH: German high-end carmaker BMW warned Wednesday it expects pre-tax profits “well below” 2018 levels this year as it announced a massive cost-cutting scheme aimed at saving $13.6 billion (€12 billion) in total by 2022.
A spokesman said that “well below” could indicate a tumble of more than 10 percent.
The Munich-based group’s 2019 result will be burdened with massive investments needed for the transition to electric cars, exchange rate headwinds and rising raw materials prices, it said in a statement.
Meanwhile it must pump more cash into measures to meet strict European carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions limits set to bite from next year.
And a one-off windfall in 2018’s results will create a negative comparison, even though pre-tax profits already fell 8.1 percent last year.
Bosses expect a “slight increase” in sales of BMW and Mini cars, with a slightly fatter operating margin that will nevertheless fall short of their 8.0-percent target.
“We will continue to implement forcefully the necessary measures for growth, continuing performance increases and efficiency,” finance director Nicolas Peter said at the group’s annual press conference.
BMW aims to achieve €12 billion of savings in the coming years through “efficiency improvements” including reducing the complexity of its range.
“Our business model must remain a profitable one in the digital era,” chief executive Harald Krueger said.
This year, most new recruits at the group will be IT specialists, while the total number of employees is set to remain flat at around 135,000 worldwide.
Departures from the sizeable fraction of the workforce born during the post-World War II baby boom and now reaching retirement age “will allow us to adapt the business even more to future topics,” BMW said.
All the firm’s forecasts are based on London and Brussels reaching a deal for an orderly Brexit and the United States foregoing new import taxes on European cars.
“Developments in tariffs” remain “a significant factor of uncertainty” in looking to the future, finance chief Peter said, adding that “the preparations for the UK’s exit from the EU will weigh on 2019’s results as well.”
In annual results released ahead of schedule last Friday, BMW blamed trade headwinds and new EU emissions tests for net profits tumbling 16.9 percent in 2018, to €7.2 billion.