Temperature Restaurant: Farah Al-Ohali offers Saudis a new take on comfort food

A family eating at Temperature restaurant. (Supplied)
Updated 18 October 2018
0

Temperature Restaurant: Farah Al-Ohali offers Saudis a new take on comfort food

  • Al-Ohali has unusual offerings that could be called the ultimate comfort food
  • She credits her Kuwaiti genes for her innate desire to explore new palates and cuisines

DAMMAM: Turning up the temperature this summer in Al-Khobar is a “modern home cuisine” restaurant, founded and run by a young Saudi-Kuwaiti female chef, Farah Al-Ohali. Temperature is just seven months old, but Sharqawis are already familiar with Al-Ohali’s unusual offerings that could be called the ultimate comfort food.
The 22-year old credits her Kuwaiti genes for her innate desire to explore new palates and cuisines.
“The dining scene in Kuwait is much more developed; and people are much more open to experimenting with their palates, compared to other GCC countries,” she told Arab News. Coming from a family of innovative cooks — her aunt is known to cook up a notoriously delightful kabsa with turkey, instead of the traditional chicken — Al-Ohali has always loved cooking and would spend hours preparing and hosting elaborate dinner parties for friends and family.


In 2015, Al-Ohali left for Florence, to pursue the culinary arts professionally. She enrolled in an intensive certification program, learning techniques for over 250 dishes, assisting the chef in his kitchen, and working in a high-pressure environment. Coming back to the Kingdom, Al-Ohali was happy to cook for her family, but they weren’t impressed.
“The butter, cream, and flour characteristic to [what they thought] of Italian cooking was missing and they hated the ‘Italian’ I made for them,” she said with a rambunctious laugh. And thus began her journey to adapt flavors to the Saudi culture.
Her research was simple: She just asked Saudis what they ate and why they liked eating a particular dish. From there, she started an Instagram-based business and a pop-up food kiosk for public events. Some of her most popular creations have been chicken tenders in a waffle cone; nachos with chutney; mac and cheese grilled sandwiches; and coffee-marinated brisket sandwiches. Before long, Al-Ohali was approached by a marketing and talent management agency who helped her set up the restaurant.
Now, Al-Ohali is the creative force and chef behind Temperature (the most important element of every dish). The ambience reflects her effervescent personality: a snazzy beverage bar, bistro-style furniture and fittings, and rose, gold and green accents.


The breakfast menu is Al-Ohali’s personal favorite and it’s easy to see why.
First, we tried The Anita, a grilled brioche sandwich brim-full of layers of beetroot pesto, basil pesto, labnah, kashkawan and mozzarella cheese. Elevating a standard pesto sandwich, The Anita is worthy of weekend-morning indulgence. Plus points too for its Instagram-worthy pink hues.
“I use simple flavors that you would eat at home, but they are paired unusually with an ingredient that is not commonly used here or with an ingredient that you wouldn’t think of normally using,” Al-Ohali explained.
The Mushroom on Toast bears testament to her approach. Brioche bread topped with mushrooms, an in-house special cream, parmesan, arugula, sunny-side-up eggs, and, finally, balsamic vinegar drizzle. The tart vinegar offsets the sweet mushroom cream and creates an interesting fusion of flavors.
The Messy French, a crunchy brioche bread with salted caramel and maple syrup served with ice-cream, makes for a perfect accompaniment to the hazelnut latte. The menu is limited, but you can be assured that ,whatever you order, your expectations of comfort food are elevated a notch or two.
The Temperature is definitely on the rise.

 


Scientists reveal “ideal diet” for peoples’ and planet’s health

Updated 17 January 2019
0

Scientists reveal “ideal diet” for peoples’ and planet’s health

  • If the world followed the “Planetary Health” diet, more than 11 million premature deaths could be prevented each year
  • Many life-threatening chronic diseases are linked to poor diets, including obesity, diabetes, malnutrition and several types of cancer

LONDON: Scientists have unveiled what they say is an ideal diet for the health of the planet and its populations — including a doubling of consumption of nuts, fruits, vegetables and legumes, and a halving of meat and sugar intake.
If the world followed the “Planetary Health” diet, the researchers said, more than 11 million premature deaths could be prevented each year, while greenhouse gas emissions would be cut and more land, water, and biodiversity would be preserved.
“The food we eat and how we produce it determines the health of people and the planet, and we are currently getting this seriously wrong,” said Tim Lang, a professor at Britain’s University of London who co-led the research.
Feeding a growing population of 10 billion people by 2050 with a healthy, sustainable diet will be impossible without transforming eating habits, improving food production and reducing food waste, he said. “We need a significant overhaul, changing the global food system on a scale not seen before.”
Many life-threatening chronic diseases are linked to poor diets, including obesity, diabetes, malnutrition and several types of cancer. The researchers said unhealthy diets currently cause more death and disease worldwide than unsafe sex, alcohol, drug and tobacco use combined.
The proposed planetary diet is the result of a three-year project commissioned by The Lancet health journal and involving 37 specialists from 16 countries.
It says global average consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar should be cut by 50 percent, while consumption of nuts, fruits, vegetables, and legumes should double.
For individual regions, this could mean even more dramatic changes: People in North America, for example, eat almost 6.5 times the recommended amount of red meat, while people in South Asia eat only half the amount suggested by the planetary diet.
Meeting the targets for starchy vegetables such as potatoes and cassava would need big changes in sub-Saharan Africa, where people on average eat 7.5 times the suggested amount.
Presenting the diet at a briefing on Wednesday, the researchers said they acknowledged it was very ambitious to hope to get everyone in the world to adopt it, not least because there is vast global inequality of access to food.
“More than 800 million people have insufficient food, while many more consume an unhealthy diet that contributes to premature death and disease,” said Walter Willett of Harvard University in the United States.
“If we can’t quite make it, it’s better to try and get as close as we can,” he said.