UK PM says open to longer post-Brexit transition

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May arrives at the European Council in Brussels on Oct. 18, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 18 October 2018
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UK PM says open to longer post-Brexit transition

  • EU negotiator Michel Barnier raised the idea as a way of breaking the deadlock on how to keep Britain’s border with Ireland open after Brexit
  • “A further idea that has emerged — and it is an idea at this stage — is to create an option to extend the implementation period for a matter of months,” says May

BRUSSELS: Prime Minister Theresa May confirmed Thursday that Britain would consider extending the transition period after Brexit for a few months if needed to agree on a new trade deal with the EU.
EU negotiator Michel Barnier raised the idea as a way of breaking the deadlock on how to keep Britain’s border with Ireland open after Brexit, the key issue holding up the divorce talks.
But May emphasized she did not expect the extension beyond the current date of December 2020 to be needed, amid anger among eurosceptics at home that Britain could be tied to the EU indefinitely.
Arriving for the second day of summit talks in Brussels, May noted that both sides remained at odds over a “backstop” plan to avoid frontier checks in Ireland if and until a new trade deal could be signed.
“A further idea that has emerged — and it is an idea at this stage — is to create an option to extend the implementation period for a matter of months,” she said.
“But the point is that this is not expected to be used, because we are working to ensure that we have that future relationship in place by the end of December 2020.
“I’m clear that it is possible to do that (deal) and that is what we are working for.
“And in those circumstances there would be no need for any proposal of this sort and I’m clear that I expect the implementation period to end at the end of December 2020.”
The possibility of an extension made front-page news in Britain on Thursday and some euroskeptic MPs warned they could not accept such a plan.
The top-selling The Sun tabloid warned it was “an outrageous non-starter.”
“Unless she can give a date when we will leave the EU and ALL its major institutions she cannot claim to have fulfilled the referendum vote” in 2016 for Brexit, it said in an editorial.


Five mosques vandalized in central England

Updated 21 March 2019
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Five mosques vandalized in central England

  • British Home Secretary Sajid Javid says that the Birmingham attacks are “deeply concerning”
  • The incidents in Birmingham come just days after an attacker killed 50 worshippers in two mosques in New Zealand

LONDON: Counter-terrorism officers in central England are investigating attacks on five mosques in which windows were apparently shattered by a sledgehammer.
The attacks in Birmingham are being treated as linked. No motive has been established.
The incidents in Birmingham come just days after an attacker killed 50 worshippers in two mosques in New Zealand. The attack last week prompted many leaders in the UK to reach out to Muslims and offer support and reassurance.
British Home Secretary Sajid Javid says that the Birmingham attacks are “deeply concerning.”
In a tweet, Javid stressed that “hateful behavior has absolutely no place in our society & will never be accepted.”


Birmingham City Council cabinet member Waseem Zaffar wrote on Twitter that the community “will fight back against any hate and division with love, peace and harmony.”