What We Are Reading Today: Identity Crisis

Updated 20 October 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Identity Crisis

Authors: John Sides, Michael Tesler & Lynn Vavreck

Donald Trump’s election victory stunned the world. How did he pull it off? Was it his appeal to alienated voters in the battleground states? Was it Hillary Clinton and the scandals associated with her long career in politics? Were key factors already in place before the nominees were even chosen?
Identity Crisis provides a gripping account of the campaign that appeared to break all the political rules — but in fact didn’t, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. Identity Crisis takes readers from the bruising primaries to an election night the outcome of which defied the predictions of the pollsters and pundits. The book shows how fundamental characteristics of the nation and its politics —the state of the economy, the Obama presidency, and the demographics of the political parties — combined with the candidates’ personalities and rhetoric to produce one of the most unexpected presidencies in history.


What We Are Reading Today: Say Nothing by Patrick Radden Keefe

Updated 23 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Say Nothing by Patrick Radden Keefe

Patrick Radden Keefe tells the story of the conflict in Northern Ireland between the Irish nationalists, the Catholics, and the unionists, the Protestants, in a time described as The Troubles.

Say Nothing is an excellent account of the Troubles; it might also be a warning, Roddy Doyle stated in a review published in The New York Times

“The book is cleverly structured. We follow people — victim, perpetrator, back to victim — leave them, forget about them, rejoin them decades later. It can be read as a detective story,” the review added. 

Doyle said: “The book is full of the language of my youth, phrases I heard every day — ‘political status,’ ‘shoot-to-kill policy,’ ‘dirty protest,’ ‘legitimate target.’ And it is full of names, names that are more than names — Gerry Adams, Bobby Sands, the Price sisters, Burntollet Bridge, Bloody Sunday, Enniskillen, Margaret Thatcher, Ian Paisley — the names of people and places, events, that carry huge emotional clout, that can still silence a room or start a fight.”

Doyle added: “If it seems as if I’m reviewing a novel, it is because “Say Nothing” has lots of the qualities of good fiction, to the extent that I’m worried I’ll give too much away.”