Google to charge Android partners up to $40 per device for apps

The fee can be as low as $2.50 and rises depending on the country and device size. (Shutterstock)
Updated 20 October 2018
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Google to charge Android partners up to $40 per device for apps

  • The new system should give Google’s rivals such as Microsoft Corp. more room to partner with hardware makers
  • The fee can be as low as $2.50 and rises depending on the country and device size

BRUSSELS/SAN FRANCISCO: Alphabet Inc’s Google will charge hardware firms up to $40 per device to use its apps under a new licensing system to replace one that the European Union this year deemed anti-competitive, a person familiar with the matter said on Friday.
The new fee goes into effect on Oct. 29 for any new smartphone or tablet models launched in the European Economic Area and running Google’s Android operating system, the company announced on Tuesday.
The fee can be as low as $2.50 and rises depending on the country and device size, the person said. It is standard across manufacturers, with the majority likely to pay around $20, the person added.
Companies can offset the charge, which applies to a suite of apps including the Google Play app store, Gmail and Google Maps, by placing Google’s search and Chrome Internet browser in a prominent position. Under that arrangement, Google would give the device maker a portion of ad revenue it generates through search and Chrome.
Tech news outlet the Verge reported the pricing earlier on Friday, citing confidential documents.
The European Commission in July found Google abused its market dominance in mobile software to essentially force Android partners to pre-install search and Chrome on their gadgets. It levied a record $5-billion fine, which Google has appealed, and threatened additional penalties unless the company ended its illegal practices.
The new system should give Google’s rivals such as Microsoft Corp. more room to partner with hardware makers to become the default apps for search and browsing, analysts said.
Qwant, a small French search company that has been critical of Google, said in a statement on Friday that it was “satisfied that the European Commission’s action pushed Google to finally give manufacturers the possibility to offer such choices to consumers.”


Gulf meeting discusses inclusion, citizenship and rights

Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL), speaks at the Wilton Park Inclusive Citizenship Dialogues forum in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday. (SPA)
Updated 14 November 2018
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Gulf meeting discusses inclusion, citizenship and rights

  • Al-Issa called on national integration programs to address segregation, whether educational, religious or ethnic

JEDDAH: The three-day Wilton Park Inclusive Citizenship Dialogues forum began in Abu Dhabi on Monday, gathering religious, intellectual and political figures from across the Middle East.
“It’s wrong to accept from individuals or institutions any justifications that threaten national unity,” said Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL).
“It’s also essential to protect legitimate freedoms, especially ones that promote and support citizenship,” he added.
“We appreciate the concept of national integration ministries in countries of religious and ethnic diversity, but… some of them suffer gaps due to the lack of participation of all national segments in the formulation of their programs,” he said.
“Some of these ministries have a single perspective that they impose on others, which results in accusations of failure or negative bias and racism,” Al-Issa added. “Also, some of these ministries may lack a social presence.”
The media should not be allowed to sacrifice national values, which protect everyone, for the sake of partisan, ideological, ethnic or financial interests, he said.
“Followers of religious and ethnic minorities have sacrificed a lot to show their loyalty to the countries that welcomed them and their parents,” he added.
“But the extremism of the far right came to reinforce prejudices at the expense of those sacrifices and the unity that brings social peace which, if undermined, can threaten the most important pillars of supreme national interest.”
Al-Issa called on national integration programs to address segregation, whether educational, religious or ethnic.