NATO says foreign soldier killed in Afghan insider attack

People attend a burial ceremony of General Abdul Razeq, the Kandahar police commander, who was killed in an attack, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan October 19, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 22 October 2018
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NATO says foreign soldier killed in Afghan insider attack

  • The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in the western province of Herat

KABUL: A foreign soldier was killed and two others wounded in an insider attack in Afghanistan on Monday, NATO said, days after a gunman wounded a US general at a high-level security meeting.
The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in the western province of Herat, which it said killed or wounded "a large number of American soldiers".
NATO's Resolute Support mission in Afghanistan did not immediately release the nationalities of the three soldiers, but it is understood they are not American.
"Initial reports indicate the attack was committed by a member of the Afghan security forces," Resolute Support said in a statement.
The so-called "green-on-blue" attack was the latest in a series of such incidents in which Afghan forces have turned their weapons on international troops with whom they are working.
It comes four days after a gunman wearing an Afghan security forces uniform opened fire on a gathering of security chiefs, including General Scott Miller, the top US and NATO commander in Afghanistan.
Miller was not hurt in the shooting in the southern city of Kandahar that killed three people, including a powerful Afghan police chief.
US Brigadier General Jeffrey Smiley was among 13 wounded.


US not renewing sanctions waivers for importing Iranian oil, working with Saudi Arabia and UAE

Updated 34 min 51 sec ago
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US not renewing sanctions waivers for importing Iranian oil, working with Saudi Arabia and UAE

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump said the US would be ending sanction waivers for countries importing Iranian oil, increasing economic pressure on the regime, according to a White House Statement.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was to discuss the move at the State Department Monday morning. The decision means sanctions waivers for five nations, including China and India and U.S. treaty allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey, will not be renewed when they expire on May 2.

The statement said that the US, Saudi Arabia and the UAE had "agreed to take timely action to assure that global demand is met as all Iranian oil is removed from the market."

White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett said on Monday that he believed global oil markets would be able to handle the US decision to force buyers of Iranian oil to either end imports or face sanctions, despite Monday's surge in oil prices.

"I think that the global oil markets are poised to be able to deal with this," Kevin Hassett said in an interview with CNBC. 

The move comes as the administration toughens its already strict penalties on Iran by trying to choke off all the revenue the country makes from oil sales.

The waivers had been in place since November, when the administration re-imposed sanctions on Iran after President Donald Trump withdrew the US from the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran.

They were granted in part to give those countries time to eliminate their purchases of Iranian oil but also to ease any impact on global energy markets with the abrupt removal of Iran's production.

Pompeo says now that production increases elsewhere will make up for the loss of Iranian oil on the market.

(With Agencies)