Civilian killings spark protests in Kashmir

Indian police try to arrest senior seperatist leader Yasin Malik, second left, during a protest march in Srinagar on Tuesday. (AFP)
Updated 24 October 2018
0

Civilian killings spark protests in Kashmir

  • Kumar called on Pakistan to take credible action against all kinds of support for terrorism” within its own borders, “rather than supporting and glorifying terrorists and terror activities against India and its other neighbors

NEW DELHI: Daisy Begum is inconsolable, waiting with bated breath for her son Aqib Malik, 16, to come out of the intensive care unit of Srinagar’s Shri Maharaja Hari Singh Hospital, where he has been in critical condition since Sunday.
Malik is one of several young men who were seriously injured on Sunday in the village of Larnoo, 75 km south of the city of Srinagar, by explosives and munitions left behind by Indian security forces after an encounter with militants.
Seven civilians were killed and more than 40 injured by shrapnel when locals gathered to see the site where the encounter took place.
“The blast occurred minutes after people gathered outside the house where the encounter took place,” Malik’s father told Arab News.
“Those who were inside their houses remained safe, but those who went outside became casualties.”
He blamed the police, asking: “How did this unfortunate incident happen? Isn’t this a deliberate attempt to scare people by hurting them?”
Dilbagh Singh, director general of police, said: “People, especially youths, should avoid going to gunfight sites or touching debris. We express sympathy with the families who lost their kin in the incident.”
Police on Tuesday arrested separatist leader Yasin Malik and his supporters in Srinagar when they tried to organize a protest march.
And leaders of the National Conference (NC), one of the mainstream political parties in Kashmir, were stopped when they came out to protest against the civilian killings.
“The government wants to suppress the voice of the people by putting restrictions on our rally,” Ali Mohammad Sagar, an NC leader, told Arab News.
He blamed the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government for “targeting the common people with bullets,” adding: “You can win people with love, not by destruction. It’s only through dialogue that matters can be resolved.”
BJP spokesman Altaf Thakur blamed separatists and opposition parties for “politicizing the incident,” telling Arab News: “We’re also pained by the incident, but those who are trying to gain political mileage out of the tragedy are playing with the blood of the innocent victims.” He added: “People should understand that the encounter site isn’t a playground for kids.”
Kashmir-based civil rights activist Khurram Parvez questioned the “impunity” enjoyed by security forces, which “have never been held accountable for extrajudicial killings and gross human rights violations.”
He blamed the BJP government for “pursuing a militaristic policy in Kashmir for electoral gains,” telling Arab News: “It’s a shame, for a country that boasts about being a democracy and a secular nation, if people are being lured by militaristic policies toward Kashmiris who happen to be Muslim.”
Journalist Manzoor-ul-Hassan, who visited the site of the incident, told Arab News: “There’s palpable anger among people. They hold security forces responsible for killing innocent civilians. It shows how casually Indian security forces take the lives of people in Kashmir.”
Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan condemned “the new cycle of killings of innocent Kashmiris... by Indian security forces.”
He tweeted: “It’s time India realize it must move to resolve the Kashmir dispute through dialogue in accordance with the UNSC (UN Security Council) resolutions & the wishes of the Kashmiri people.”
Raveesh Kumar, spokesman for India’s External Affairs Ministry, called the tweet “deeply regrettable” and urged the Pakistani leadership to “look inwards and address its own issues.”
Kumar called on Pakistan to take “credible action against all kinds of support for terrorism” within its own borders, “rather than supporting and glorifying terrorists and terror activities against India and its other neighbors.”


UK court rejects case brought by mother of Daesh 'Beatle' held in Syria

Updated 50 min 41 sec ago
0

UK court rejects case brought by mother of Daesh 'Beatle' held in Syria

  • El Shafee Elsheikh and Alexanda Kotey are being held by Kurdish militia after being captured in Syria last year
  • United States wants to extradite them and Britain has said it will not stand in the way

LONDON: The mother of one of the British Daesh militants suspected of murdering western hostages, lost a legal challenge on Friday that it was wrong for Britain to assist a US investigation which could lead to them facing the death penalty.
Britons El Shafee Elsheikh and Alexanda Kotey — two of a notorious group of British fighters nicknamed “The Beatles” — are being held by Kurdish militia after being captured in Syria last year.
The United States wants to extradite them and Britain has said it will not stand in the way of any future US prosecution that would seek the death penalty, waiving a long-standing objection to executions.
Elsheikh’s mother, Maha El Gizouli, had sought a judicial review, saying it was unlawful for Britain’s interior minister to provide mutual legal assistance in a case which could lead to prosecutions for offenses which carried the death penalty.
Her lawyers said the minister’s actions were flawed, inconsistent with Britain’s unequivocal opposition to the death penalty and violated her son’s human rights. However, London’s High Court disagreed and dismissed her claim.
“My priority has always been to ensure we deliver justice for the victims’ families and that the individuals suspected of these sickening crimes face prosecution as quickly as possible,” Home Secretary Sajid Javid said.
“Our long-standing opposition to the death penalty has not changed. Any evidence shared with the US in this case must be for the express purpose of progressing a federal prosecution.”
The most notorious of the four of the so-called Beatles was Mohammed Emwazi, known as “Jihadi John,” who is believed to have been killed in a US-British missile strike in 2015.
He became a public face of Daesh and appeared in videos showing the murders of US journalists Steven Sotloff and James Foley, US aid worker Abdul-Rahman Kassig, British aid workers David Haines and Alan Henning, Japanese journalist Kenji Goto and other hostages.
“This group of terrorists is associated with some of the most barbaric crimes committed during the conflict in Syria,” Graeme Biggar, Director of National Security at Britain’s interior ministry, said in a written statement to the court.
Britain has said it does not want the men repatriated to the United Kingdom and their British citizenship has been withdrawn.
British prosecutors concluded they did not have the evidence to launch their own case against the men but US officials then expressed frustration with the British stance of seeking an assurance that US prosecutors would not call for the death penalty, court documents showed.
However, last June, British ministers and senior officials decided the best way of ensuring a prosecution and to protect US relations was to seek no such assurance in this case.
That decision provoked criticism from opposition lawmakers and from some in the government’s own party who accused ministers of secretly abandoning Britain’s opposition to the death penalty.