Dry Danube reveals hidden treasure in Hungary

Hungarian archaeologists inspect the site where they found coins from the 16th-17th centuries and historical weaponry on the banks of the Danube near Erd, 25 km from Budapest. (AFP)
Updated 25 October 2018
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Dry Danube reveals hidden treasure in Hungary

  • Archaeologist Katalin Kovacs: Around 2,000 coins have been found, as well as arms, pikes, cannon balls and swords
  • Archaeologists are working frantically, assisted by divers and drones, to extract what they can from the site before a rise in river levels

ERD: A treasure trove of some 2,000 gold and silver coins has been found on the Danube riverbed in Hungary thanks to an exceptionally low water level, archaeologists said Thursday.
“Around 2,000 coins have been found, as well as arms, pikes, cannon balls and swords,” Katalin Kovacs, an archaeologist with the Ferenczy Museum Center, told the MTI agency.
The discovery was made this week where the river passes by the town of Erd, to the south of Budapest.
Archaeologists are working frantically, assisted by divers and drones, to extract what they can from the site before a rise in river levels expected this weekend.
Like other rivers across Europe, the Danube is in some places at a historically low level after a long period of dry weather. In Budapest it is running at a mere 38cm (15 inches), which has affected shipping traffic.
The treasure, which includes ducats and pennies, was found amid the wreck of a trading boat whose origin is not yet known, archaeologists said.Like many rivers across Europe, the Danube is in some places at a historically low level after a long period of dry weather
“The coins are 90 percent foreign and date from between 1630 and 1743,” archaeologist Balazs Nagy told the Klub radio station, adding that they had been minted in “the Netherlands, in France, Zurich and even the Vatican.”
The low level of the Danube has already revealed the remains of Budapest’s former Franz Josef bridge, which was destroyed during World War II, as well as an American bomb from the same period.


’Pig’ British tourists to be deported from New Zealand

Updated 16 January 2019
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’Pig’ British tourists to be deported from New Zealand

  • The family have been involved in a string of incidents in the country, including accusations of littering, assault, not paying for restaurant meals and intimidating behavior
  • "They're worse than pigs and I'd like to see them out of the country," Auckland mayor said

WELLINGTON: Members of a British family have been branded “worse than pigs” and face deportation from New Zealand after a spree of bad behavior that left normally easygoing Kiwis outraged.
The family have been involved in a string of incidents in and around Auckland and Hamilton, including accusations of littering, assault, not paying for restaurant meals and intimidating behavior.
Auckland mayor Phil Goff led national outcry at the tourists’ antics, demanding the police take action. “These guys are trash. They are leeches,” he told a local radio station.
“If you say one time ‘I found a hair or an ant in my meal’ you’d believe it but they find it every meal that they have as a way of evading payment. That’s a criminal activity.
“They’re worse than pigs and I’d like to see them out of the country.”
New Zealand’s assistant general manager of immigration, Peter Devoy, said the family had been issued with a deportation notice on the grounds of “matters relating to character.”
One 26-year-old member of the family on Wednesday pleaded guilty to stealing NZ$55 ($37) worth of goods from a petrol station.
The family attracted extensive media coverage in New Zealand after a video showed them leaving beer boxes, bottles and other rubbish strewn on a popular beach.
When a woman asked them to clean up their litter, a child in the group can be seen on video threatening he would “knock your brains out.”
Stuff Media reported that one family member hit a journalist with her shoe after being approached for comment.
A member of the family told the New Zealand Herald they have now decided to cut short their holiday and will return home this week.
John Johnson insisted his family were of good stock, claimed his grandfather was the “10th richest man in England” and said he was made to feel “very unwelcome” in New Zealand.