Why no one in Jordan believes the weather forecasts

1 / 2
Jordanian rescuers search for survivors of flash floods at the Dead Sea area, Jordan, Friday, Oct. 26, 2018. (AP)
2 / 2
Jordanian civil defence members search for survivors after rain storms unleashed flash floods, near the Dead Sea, in Jordan on October 26, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 26 October 2018
0

Why no one in Jordan believes the weather forecasts

  • The Education Ministry and the school are responsible for what happened

AMMAN: Veteran weatherman Jamal Al-Mousa told Arab News there is a flaw in how most people react to weather forecasts.
Many people believe that weather predictions should have no margin of error, and that their accuracy should be 100 percent, he said. “This is not possible, of course,” he added.
“The Jordan Meteorological Department (JMD) weather reports are based on scientific analysis and satellite pictures. But the weather is subject to change at any time. Failing to issue accurate reports should not be a reason for the public not to take weather forecasts seriously. What would they lose if they take precautions?”
Al-Mousa, a weatherman for 40 years, said all parties shared responsibility for the tragic incident on Thursday. “The Education Ministry and the school are responsible for what happened. But they are not the only ones. The police department and the families of the victims also bear part of the responsibility,” he said.
Nasser Bashiti, a former school principal, told Arab News that in the past few years many JMD weather forecasts were unreliable. “The efficiency of their reports was not up to standard and many of the predictions never even came close to reality. “In normal situations, people should take precautions and prepare for any bad weather conditions. But even apart from the JMD’s failure to issue reliable and scientific reports, people trust international weather reports or non-government weather agencies, and in many cases these institutions lack professional and advanced weather-forecast devices.
“This leads to people’s recklessness with regard to weather forecasts.”


Israel to name Golan settlement after Trump

Updated 16 min 39 sec ago
0

Israel to name Golan settlement after Trump

  • Netanyahu said in a video message that he would present a resolution to the government calling for a new settlement named after the US president
  • Trump recognized Israel’s claim of sovereignty over the part of the strategic plateau it seized from Syria in the 1967 Six-Day War

JERUSALEM: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Tuesday he plans to name a new settlement in the occupied Golan after US President Donald Trump in appreciation of his recognition of Israel’s claim of sovereignty there.
Netanyahu, who has been on a trip to the region with his family for the week-long Passover holiday, said in a video message that he would present a resolution to the government calling for a new settlement named after the US president.
“All Israelis were deeply moved when President Trump made his historic decision to recognize Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights,” he said.
Trump again broke with longstanding international consensus on March 25 when he recognized Israel’s claim of sovereignty over the part of the strategic plateau it seized from Syria in the 1967 Six-Day War.
The decision came only two weeks ahead of a tightly contested Israeli election, which saw Netanyahu win a fifth term in office.
Trump has shifted US policy sharply in Israel’s favor since taking office, most notably by recognizing the disputed city of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.
Israel annexed 1,200 square kilometers (460 square miles) of the Golan it seized in 1981, a move never recognized by the international community.
Around 18,000 Syrians from the Druze sect — most of whom refuse to take Israeli citizenship — remain in the occupied Golan.
Some 20,000 Israeli settlers have moved there, spread over 33 settlements.