The Six: Films you didn’t know were shot in Morocco

Some scenes of 'Lawrence of Arabia’ were shot in the country. (Photo courtesy: Columbia Pictures)
Updated 28 October 2018
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The Six: Films you didn’t know were shot in Morocco

DUBAI: The narrow alleyways and vast deserts of Morocco have long played host to Hollywood film crews, but did you know that these blockbusters were shot in the country?
‘John Wick 3: Parabellum’
The film, to be released in 2019, follows hit man John Wick as he fights off other assassins. Halle Berry stars in the upcoming film and has been treating fans to behind-the-scenes clips from Morocco on social media.

‘Othello’
The 1951 film adaptation of William Shakespeare’s play opens with a scene shot in Essaouira, a port city protected by 18th century seafront ramparts.
‘Lawrence of Arabia’
Some scenes of the grand classic based on the life of T. E. Lawrence, released in 1962, were shot in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Ait Benhaddou.
‘The Mummy’
Actors Brendan Fraser and Rachel Weisz escape the wrath of malevolent ancient Egyptian beings in the 1999 re-make of this film, shot near the town of Erfoud.
‘Inception’
Christopher Nolan’s 2010 blockbuster was partly filmed in Tangier and starred Leonardo DiCaprio and Marion Cotillard among other famous faces.
‘Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation’
The 2015 film starring action aficionado Tom Cruise was shot in various locations across Morocco, including Rabat and Casablanca.

 


Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

Updated 57 min 8 sec ago
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Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

  • Authorities estimate the mosquer dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries
  • Rare to find house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers

RAHAT, Israel: Archaeologists in Israel have discovered the remains of one of the world’s oldest rural mosques, built around the time Islam arrived in the holy land, they said on Thursday.
The Israel Antiquities Authority estimates that the mosque, uncovered ahead of new construction in the Bedouin town of Rahat in the Negev desert, dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries.
There are large mosques known to be from that period in Jerusalem and in Makkah but it is rare to find a house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers, the antiquities authority said.
Excavated at the site were the remains of an open-air mosque — a rectangular building, about the size of a single-car garage, with a prayer niche facing south toward Makkah.
“This is one of the earliest mosques known from the beginning of the arrival of Islam in Israel, after the Arab conquest of 636 C.E.,” said Gideon Avni of the antiquities authority.
“The discovery of the village and the mosque in its vicinity are a significant contribution to the study of the history of the country during this turbulent period.”